IMAGISM AND MARTIN SCORSESE: IMAGES SUSPENDED AND EXTENDED – by George P. Castellitto

2018-02-15T19:01:33+00:00February 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

Scorsese's technique of "freezing” objects generates a particular method of cinematic exposition in which characters and objects are portrayed in a moment between movement and non-movement; this “moment” is the bridge between potential behavior and stasis. The "thing” is frozen or suspended on the screen, and the possibility of either stasis or experience emerges from this momentary suspension.

Mean Streets: Everyday Inferno – Review by Pauline Kael

2019-08-12T21:33:52+01:00January 11th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Martin Scorsese’s Mean Streets is a true original of our period, a triumph of personal filmmaking. It has its own hallucinatory look; the characters live in the darkness of bars, with lighting and color just this side of lurid. It has its own unsettling, episodic rhythm and a high-charged emo­tional range that is dizzyingly sensual.

Raging Bull: Interview with Martin Scorsese (1981) by Michael Henry

2019-10-13T09:32:53+01:00July 31st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

This interview took place in Paris during the night of February 11-12, 1981. A translation of "Nuit blanche et chambre noire" from Positif, April 1981. Translated by Peter Brunette. by Michael Henry HENRY: Robert De Niro brought you Juke La Motta's autobiography when you were preparing Taxi Driver. What attracted [...]

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