Bonnie and Clyde (1967): Gangsters on the Road to Nowhere – Review by Richard Gilman

2018-08-15T13:29:43+00:00August 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Bonnie and Clyde is about violence and crime, and the desire of the ego to define itself, to live in violence and crime if it can't in anything else. To this end it remains properly sympathetic to the characters it has plucked from history, the sympathy being given not to crime but to a process in which crime figures, to the action by which the ego displays itself as the embattled source of everything—crime, love, violence, goodness, error, dream.

The Servant (1963) – Review by Andrew Sarris

2018-08-07T13:59:53+00:00August 7th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Servant is a genuinely shocking experience for audiences with the imagination to understand the dimensions of the shock. In years to come The Servant may be cited as a prophetic work making the decline and fall of our last cherished illusions about ourselves and our alleged civilization.

2001: A Space Odyssey – Review by John Simon [The New Leader]

2018-08-07T13:17:06+00:00August 7th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

2001: A Space Odyssey is fascinating when it concentrates on apes or machines, and dreadful when it deals with the in-betweens: humans. For all its lively visual and mechanical spectacle, this is a kind of space-Spartacus and, more pretentious still, a shaggy God story.

Once upon a Time in the West (1969) – Review by Dave Kehr

2018-08-03T16:01:50+00:00August 3rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

In Leone’s hands, capitalism itself becomes a mythic force, as much a part of the landscape (it’s embodied here by the building of a railroad across the desert) as the horses or mountain ranges. In criticizing the myth — in filling in the economic relationships American westerns have skipped over —Leone expands and enriches it, which is what the best criticism does.

THE KILLING FIELDS (1984): UNREAL – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-23T10:22:48+00:00July 19th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Killing Fields, which is based on Sydney Schanberg’s 1980 Times Magazine article "The Death and Life of Dith Pran,” is by no means a negligible movie. It shows us the Khmer Rouge transforming Cambodia into a nationwide gulag, and the scenes of this genocidal revolution have the breadth and terror of something deeply imagined.

PRIZZI’S HONOR (1985) – by Pauline Kael

2018-07-17T11:02:47+00:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

If John Huston’s name were not on Prizzi’s Honor, I’d have thought a fresh new talent had burst on the scene, and he’d certainly be the hottest new director in Hollywood. The picture has a daring comic tone—it revels voluptuously in the murderous finagling of the members of a Brooklyn Mafia family, and rejoices in their scams.

RAMBO: FIRST BLOOD PART II (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-17T10:23:28+00:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Rambo: First Blood Part II explodes your previous conception of “overwrought”—it’s like a tank sitting on your lap firing at you. Jump-cutting from one would-be high point to another, Rambo is to the action film what Flashdance was to the musical, with one to-be-cherished difference: audiences are laughing at it.

INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-09T11:50:11+00:00July 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Pauline Kael The great thing about a tall tale on the screen is that you can be shown the preposterous and the implausible. In Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, the director Steven Spielberg is like a magician whose tricks are so daring they make you laugh. He [...]

THE PLUCK OF ‘BARRY LYNDON’ – Review by Jonathan Rosenbaum

2018-05-09T09:35:18+00:00May 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

So Barry Lyndon is a failure. So what? How many “successes” have you seen lately that are half as interesting or accomplished, that are worth even ten minutes of thought after leaving them? By my own rough count, a smug little piece of engineering like A Clockwork Orange was worth about five. I’m reminded of what Jonas Mekas wrote about Zazie several years ago: “The fact that the film is a failure means nothing. Didn’t God create a failure, too?”

THE ADVENTURES OF BARON MUNCHAUSEN (1988): TOO HIP BY HALF – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-04-23T17:15:13+00:00April 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

What saves Munchausen from mediocrity is that you sense that Gilliam is brainstorming. He goes hippety-hoppety all over the place. The picture is too dry and too busy to be considered merely mediocre. And he has his gifts. He retains an edge of Monty Python’s cranky, warped slapstick, and he has a painter’s eye.

CIMINO, KUBRICK E IL GIOCO DELL’IDENTITÀ E DELLA DIFFERENZA – di Guido Barlozzetti

2018-04-22T13:30:42+00:00April 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Da Nang è lontana da Montelepre. La storia di Salvatore Giuliano e la guerra del Vietnam non si consumano sotto lo stesso cielo. Ma, forse, le traiettorie della "blindatissima" Full Metal Jacket e la parabola fatale del Siciliano attraversano lo "stesso" cinema.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY – Review by John Hofsess

2018-03-08T18:45:20+00:00March 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

2001 no less than Dr. Strangelove is an apocalyptic vision: it i is an alternate future but no less pessimistic. Beneath its austerely beautiful surface an alarm is sounded for us to examine a problem of which Dr. Strangelove was a pronounced symptom: the possibility that man is as much at the mercy of his own artifacts as ever he was of the forces of nature.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY – Reviews by Louise Sweeney and John Allen [The Christian Science Monitor]

2018-03-08T16:13:04+00:00March 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Louise Sweeney, New York-based film critic for The Christian Science Monitor, wrote a generally favorable review following the New York premiere of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Boston staff critic John Allen’s full-page review appeared in the Monitor a month later and M-G-M reprinted it as an ad in a Sunday edition of The New York Times.

POPEYE (1980) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-03-07T08:52:35+00:00March 7th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Sometimes the components of a picture seem miraculously right and you go to it expecting a magical interaction. That's the case with Popeye. But it comes off a little like some of the Jacques Tati comedies, where you can see the intelligence and skill that went into the gags yet you don't hear yourself laughing.

‘THE GODFATHER’ AND THE DECLINE OF MARLON BRANDO – Review by Stanley Kauffmann

2018-03-02T22:07:19+00:00March 2nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Hurricane Marlon is sweeping the country, and I wish it were more than hot air. A tornado of praise—cover stories and huzzahs—blasts out the news that Brando is giving a marvelous performance as Don Corleone in The Godfather, the lapsed Great Actor has regained himself, and so on. As a Brando-watcher for almost 30 years, I’d like to agree.

BAND OF OUTSIDERS: GODARD AMONG THE GANGSTERS – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-27T23:24:31+00:00February 27th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Jean-Luc Godard intended to give the public what it wanted. His next film was going to be about a girl and a gun—”A sure-fire story which will sell a lot of tickets.” And so, like Henry James’ hero in The Next Time he proceeded to make a work of art that sold fewer tickets than ever. What was to be a simple commercial movie about a robbery became Band of Outsiders.

POLTERGEIST (1982): HOOPER’S VISION & SPIELBERG’S CHARM CREATE A GREAT GHOST STORY – Review by Kyle Counts

2018-02-25T11:45:23+00:00February 25th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Spiel­berg, as co-author/producer (and some say director), has tempered Hooper’s harsh, visceral style with folksy humor and near-bloodless titillation, while Hooper has underscored Spielberg's conservative, child-at-play consciousness with dark touches of Grand Guignol.

THE DEER HUNTER: “GOD BLESS AMERICA” – Review by Chris Auty [Time Out]

2018-02-24T19:28:02+00:00February 24th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Deer Hunter is a brilliant epic about the simple things of life. To its director Michael Cimino they are 'friendship, courage, dignity, grace' and through them the movie's Vietnam veterans turn into Homeric heroes. Chris Auty pays his respects, but wonders if this catalogue of rituals hasn't tried to make time stand still.

CRIES AND WHISPERS: BERGMAN’S WOMEN – Review by Paul D. Zimmerman

2018-02-23T08:20:53+00:00February 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Ingmar Bergman—the Swedish creator of The Seventh Seal—long ago abandoned his interest in the mysterious ties between God and man in favor of a broader humanism. His latest film, Cries and Whispers, confronts the realities of the human condition—man’s destiny on "the dark, dirty earth under an empty, cruel Heaven.” Now Bergman seeks his answers in the workings of the human heart alone.

FRENZY: THE HITCHCOCK PROBLEM – Review by William S. Pechter

2018-02-22T09:13:24+00:00February 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

With Frenzy, its director, Alfred Hitchcock, is said to have returned to form, but to what form has he returned? To a resounding orchestral accompaniment, so different from the anxiety-producing music with which Bernard Herrmann contributed so much to Vertigo and Psycho, we move from a panoramic view of the city of London to a Thames-side gathering at which a politician's speech about progress against the river’s pollution is interrupted by the discovery of a floating corpse.

CRIES AND WHISPERS: BERGMAN’S STUDY IN SCARLET – Review by Hollis Alpert

2018-02-22T00:03:54+00:00February 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

In Ingmar Bergman’s latest film, Cries and Whispers, the predominant tones are red, and from the very beginning of its production he did not hesitate to explain why this is so. He had a dream, he said, and in the dream he saw a group of women dressed in white, whispering together in a room bathed completely in red.

THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE (1972) – Review by Robert Hatch [The Nation]

2018-02-20T18:37:02+00:00February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

By setting his film in the surreal world of dreaming, Buñuel casts himself as a jester rather than as an Old Testament prophet, crying "Woe, woe." Awake, this assemblage might have been too much for the old man’s equanimity; while they sleep, it is enough that he skip about them, poking them keenly with his rattle.

THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE: ANARCHIST’S LAUGHTER – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-23T13:44:13+00:00February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a cosmic vaudeville show —an Old Master’s mischief. Now seventy-two, Luis Bunuel is no longer savage about the hypocrisy and the inanity of the privileged classes. They don’t change, and since they have become a persistent bad joke to him, he has grown almost fond of their follies—the way one can grow fond of the snarls and the silliness of vicious pets.

DELIVERANCE (1972) – Review by Richard Schickel

2018-02-20T16:12:34+00:00February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

I suspect that James Dickey, who adapted his best-selling novel Deliverance for the screen, and John Boorman, who directed it, are trying to tell us something fairly important by subjecting four sober, settled, middle-class gentlemen in their thirties to a series of wilderness trials that test their courage and cunning in a manner we usually associate with the initiation of adolescents into primitive tribes.

PALE RIDER (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-18T11:19:33+00:00February 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

As an actor, Eastwood never lets down his guard. His idea of being a real man is that it’s something you have to pretend to be—as Sergio Leone put it, he’s wearing a suit of armor. This actor has made a career out of his terror of expressiveness. Now here he is playing a stiff, a ghost. It’s perfect casting, but he doesn’t have the daring to let go and have fun with it. Even as a ghost, he’s armored.

BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-18T11:21:27+00:00February 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

What keeps Back to the Future from being a comedy classic is that its eye is on the market. Despite Zemeckis and Gale’s wit in devising intricate structures that keep blowing fuses, the thinking here is cramped and conventional. I wish that moviemakers and their designers would stop using old Life magazines for their images of the American past.

VICTIM (1961) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-11T23:35:52+00:00February 11th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

It was a bit startling to pick up an English newspaper and see that the review of Victim was entitled “Ten-letter word”—but as it turned out. The Observer was referring not to Lenny Bruce’s much publicized hyphenated word but to the simple term “homosexual,” which it appears is startling enough in a movie to make the Johnson office refuse to give Victim a seal of approval.

ACCATTONE: POET AND THE PIMP – Review by Stanley Kauffmann

2018-02-08T13:05:59+00:00February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Accattone lives as a work of narrow but intense vision—a film about viciousness and criminality that evokes compassion. Its style is neorealist: it was made on locations, not in studios, with nonprofessional performers. Sometimes this method makes merely vernacular films, but it gives Accattone a grainy, gripping authenticity.

WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE (2014) – Review by Kate Stables

2018-02-04T01:05:24+00:00February 4th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Despite the absence of the kind of imaginative spectacle or battle sequences that galvanised Spirited Away (2001) and Princess Mononoke (1997), When Marnie Was There is expertly atmospheric. Its action is all contained within its emotional ebb and flow, as fierce as the tides that lap at Marsh House.

THE GODFATHER: THE RESURRECTION OF DON BRANDO – Review by Richard Schickel

2018-02-03T19:23:51+00:00February 3rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

There’s nothing fun or funny to be found here. It offers us only the absorption of good acting and good storytelling combined with a plausible anthropology of a strange, terribly relevant culture. What more could we possibly want from a movie? How often, these days, do we get anything like all that?

THE GODFATHER: HOW BRANDO BROUGHT DON CORLEONE TO LIFE – by Joseph Gelmis [Newsday]

2018-02-03T18:49:35+00:00February 3rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

And then there was Marion Brando, against all the odds, cast in one of filmdom’s juiciest roles, as mob chief Don Vito Corleone. He was eased in, despite stiff opposition from the studio brass, because of the advocacy of a thirtyish fan, Francis Ford Coppola, an Italian-American who happened to be the director of The Godfather. Once he got the part, Brando in turn helped Coppola maintain camaraderie during the frenzied three-month shooting by kibitzing with the cast and establishing a fatherly relationship.

THE GODFATHER PLAYS ON OUR SECRET ADMIRATION FOR MEN WHO GET WHAT THEY WANT – by Arthur Schlesinger Jr. [Vogue]

2018-02-02T17:37:51+00:00February 2nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Inflation does not always assure survival. My guess is that three years from now we will still remember scenes from Raoul Walsh’s The Roaring Twenties (1939) while The Godfather will have become a vague memory.

THE LIFE OF BRIAN (1979) – Review by Dennis Altman [Cinema Papers]

2018-01-28T16:46:52+00:00January 28th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

Blasphemy is by no means dead in Britain, as the recent condemnation of Gay News, for publishing a poem portraying Christ as homosexual, reveals. But The Life of Brian has nothing about it as shocking to the faithful as this, and is saved indeed from blasphemy by its sheer vulgarity.

ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ (1979) Review by Jack Clancy [Cinema Papers]

2018-01-28T13:13:49+00:00January 28th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Escape from Alcatraz opens with the camera panning across San Francisco Bay and the bridge, and then to the grim, gloomy island of Alcatraz. The first sequence, as the credits come up, shows the arrival, through rain and darkness, of a prisoner for the "Rock": it is shot in tight, constricted close- up and mostly in shadow.

BARRY LYNDON: SETTECENTO – Recensione di Enzo Ungari

2018-01-23T12:32:08+00:00January 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Lontano dal cinema di formule e procedimenti a cui rimanda soltanto per la sua mole produttiva, Barry Lyndon si situa in quella zona dove il cinema è invenzione, ricerca, esperimento. Ma dove tutti, coraggiosamente e confusamente, cercano, Stanley Kubrick trova. Non domanda, risponde.

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND: THE GREENING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-21T11:50:05+00:00January 21st, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Close Encounters of the Third Kind is the most innocent of all technological-marvel movies, and one of the most satisfying. This film has retained some of the wonder and bafflement we feel when we first go into a plan­etarium: we ooh and aah at the vastness, and at the beauty of the mystery. The film doesn’t overawe us, though, because it has a child’s playfulness and love of surprises.

BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI’S 1900: HAIL, FOLLY! – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-20T12:31:28+00:00January 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Bertolucci is trying to transcend the audience appeal of his lyrical, psy­chological films. He is trying to make a people’s film by drawing on the mythology of movies, as if it were a collective memory. 1900 is a romantic moviegoer's vision of the class struggle—a love poem for the movies as well as for the life of those who live communally on the land.

THE AMERICAN FRIEND – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-20T08:45:45+00:00January 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Angst-dark primary colors—reds and blues so intense they’re near­psychedelic, yet grimy, rotting in the thick, muggy atmosphere. Cities that blur into each other. Characters as figures in cityscapes or as exiles in rooms that are insistently not home. And, under it all, morbid, premon­itory music.

C’ERA UNA VOLTA IN AMERICA – Recensione di Stefano Consiglio [Filmcritica]

2018-01-15T16:18:04+00:00January 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

«Credevo fosse un’avventura. E invece era la vita... » (J. Conrad) ... Riprendendo questa frase nel corso di un’intervista, Sergio Leo­ne si riferiva al tempo trascorso da quando ebbe l’idea di trarre un film dal libro di Harry Grey A mano armata a quando, finalmente il film è riuscito a farlo

QUEST FOR FIRE (1981) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-12T15:41:04+00:00January 12th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Eighty thousand years ago, on broad primeval plains, Naoh (Everett McGill), the bravest warrior of the spear-carrying Ulam tribe, and two fellow-warriors, Amoukar (Ron Perlman) and Gaw (Nameer El-Kadi), are sent out on the sacred mission of finding fire and bringing it back to the Ulam.

MEAN STREETS: EVERYDAY INFERNO – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-11T16:26:20+00:00January 11th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , |

Martin Scorsese’s Mean Streets is a true original of our period, a triumph of personal filmmaking. It has its own hallucinatory look; the charac­ters live in the darkness of bars, with lighting and color just this side of lurid. It has its own unsettling, episodic rhythm and a high-charged emo­tional range that is dizzyingly sensual.

DAVID LYNCH’S THE ELEPHANT MAN – Review by Bruce Kawin [Film Quarterly]

2017-12-31T18:58:44+00:00December 31st, 2017|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , , |

Not since Shakespeare called for “a muse of fire” in Henry V and Olivier provided the light of an arc-rod projector has there been such an interesting opportunity to examine the relations between film and theater as David Lynch’s The Elephant Man.

THE GODFATHER: ALCHEMY – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-12-30T13:54:12+00:00December 30th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , |

A wide, startlingly vivid view of a Mafia dynasty, in which organized crime becomes an obscene nightmare image of American free enterprise. The movie is a popular melodrama with its roots in the gangster films of the 30s, but it expresses a new tragic realism, and it's altogether extraordinary.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1968) – Review by Andrew Sarris [The Village Voice]

2017-12-17T11:25:38+00:00December 17th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , |

Once Upon a Time in the West is Sergio Leone’s most American Western, but it is still dominantly and paradoxically European in spirit, at one and the same time Christian and Marxist, despairing and exultant, nihilistic and regenerative.

THE GODFATHER PART II: FATHERS AND SONS – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-12-12T09:42:17+00:00December 12th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Throughout the three hours and twenty minutes of Part II, there are so many moments of epiphany — mysterious, reverberant images, such as the small Vito singing in his cell — that one scarcely has the emotional resources to deal with the experience of this film.

THE SHINING: A NEW DEFINITION FOR “ULTIMATE HORROR” – by Jim Wynorski [Fangoria]

2017-12-12T12:24:34+00:00December 9th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Both Kubrick and King merit congratulations for making The Shining one of the most overpowering experiences of horror ever committed to celluloid. It manages to treat intangible, elusive subjects—ghosts, demons, spirits and the like—as if they were as real as this morning's headlines.

THIRD DIVE INTO THE OCEAN: ANDREI TARKOVSKY’S ‘THE STALKER’ – Positif review

2017-12-08T11:04:12+00:00December 8th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The thaw in the Soviet Union made it possible for new filmmakers, although not without difficulty, to assert their personal vision. The most striking of these was indisputably Andrei Tarkovsky, Emmanuel Carrère discusses the grandeur of Stalker.

DANCES WITH WOLVES (1990) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-30T23:23:17+00:00November 28th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The movie—Costner’s debut as a director—is childishly naïve. When Lieutenant Dunbar is alone with his pet wolf, he’s like Robinson Crusoe on Mars. When he tries to get to know the Sioux, and he and they are feeling each other out, it’s like a sci-fi film that has the hero trying to communicate with an alien race.

DR. STRANGELOVE: OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB – Review by Penelope Gilliatt

2017-11-16T15:25:17+00:00November 16th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

The key of the brilliant comic tone of the film is in the title. What makes the picture so funny, terrifying and horribly believable is that everyone in the film really has learned to stop worrying, as smokers do about lung cancer after living with the statistics for a bit.

IMPORTANCE AND ULTIMATE FAILURE OF LAST TANGO IN PARIS

2017-11-12T18:38:19+00:00November 12th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

Last Tango in Paris is an important film because of the way it deals with film history. By showing the inadequacy of and parodying two recent influential film styles, 1950s Hollywood and French New Wave, Bertolucci critiques and condemns the outmoded ideas and attitudes which informed these styles.

STANLEY KUBRICK’S THE SHINING – Review by Flo Leibowitz and Lynn Jeffress [Film Quarterly]

2017-09-16T13:13:43+00:00September 16th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Flo Leibowitz and Lynn Jeffress To all appearances, The Shining is simply a hope­lessly clichéd gothic horror film. Can this be ser­ious? A lonely house on a hill haunted by ancestral ghosts that curse successive generations and force them to re-enact the original horror. It is not even redeemed [...]

SPARTACUS (1960) and THE GUNS OF NAVARONE (1961) – The Guardian Review

2017-08-30T08:36:37+00:00August 30th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

EPIC FILMS ANCIENT AND MODERN A week of epics. It is true that neither Spartacus (Gaumont) nor The Guns of Navarone (Regal) conform to Bible thumping traditions but as both last for over three hours, including intermissions for the audience to recuperate on orange squash, and are littered with stars, [...]

LE NOTTI DI CABIRIA (1957) – Review by James Kerans [Film Quarterly]

2017-08-23T15:33:29+00:00August 23rd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by James Kerans All the Fellini virtues are here: the fluent camera, the wit, the elegant composition, the theme-and-variations style, the melange of theatrical and religious symbol, the parabolic eloquence, the vocabulary of private motifs. La Strada is more exciting, because it calls for the management of material more coarse, [...]

LAST TANGO IN PARIS (1972) – Review by Bosley Crowther

2017-08-23T11:51:59+00:00August 23rd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Bosley Crowther The vast attention that Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris received while it was several months in the making and when it opened in the fall of 1972 was not due to the prospect of its being a likely worldshaking film. It was because Marlon Brando was [...]

KUBRICK’S STRANGE LOVE – Review by Gerard Fay [The Guardian]

2017-08-21T23:08:49+00:00August 21st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Gerard Fay Stanley Kubrick is unusual among American film directors for a complete lack of flamboyance. He dresses without distinction, talks quietly and modestly, eats and drinks frugally, reads and thinks a lot. He is not an Austrian or even an Hungarian but was born in the Bronx, New [...]

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE – Review by Don Daniels [Sight and Sound]

2017-08-21T15:21:59+00:00August 21st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Don Daniels Stanley Kubrick's films seem to provoke the kind of mindless praise and attack that is called 'controversy' these days. In the case of A Clockwork Orange, the responses have ranged from 'brilliant' to 'boring', with special attention to the film's depictions of violence. If the viewer responds [...]

THE WILD BUNCH: MAN AND MYTH – Time Magazine Review

2017-08-19T16:44:36+00:00August 19th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

"When the legend becomes fact," says the canny newspaper editor in John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, "print the legend." Sam Peckinpah is a filmmaker dedicated to telling truths and still preserving the legend of the American West. In feature films (Ride the High Country, Major Dundee) and [...]

INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE (1989) – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-08-18T15:32:09+00:00August 18th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Pauline Kael A friend of mine who’s in his early fifties and is eminent in his field says that when he grows up he wants to be Sean Connery. He doesn’t mean the smooth operator James Bond; he means the bluff, bare-domed Connery of The Man Who Would Be [...]

THE GODFATHER PART III (1990) – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-08-19T10:34:04+00:00August 18th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Pauline Kael At the end of The Godfather Part II (1974), the story was complete—beautifully complete. Francis Ford Coppola knew it, and for over a decade he resisted Paramount’s pleas for another sequel. But the studio’s blandishments became more honeyed, his piggy bank was smashed, and late in 1988 [...]

BLADE RUNNER – Review by Michael Dempsey [Film Quarterly]

2018-02-02T01:47:49+00:00August 14th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Michael Dempsey In director Ridley Scott’s $30-million noir thriller, Blade Runner, set in Los Angeles 36 years from now, sophisticated new robots known as “replicants” have drastically narrowed the gap between humans and machines. Prize creations of the cadaverous, ironic Dr. Eldon Tyrell and his superconglomerate, they not only [...]

BARRY LYNDON: KUBRICK’S GRANDEST GAMBLE – by Richard Schickel

2017-08-12T11:28:54+00:00August 11th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Richard Schickel FIRST PARADOX: Barry Lyndon, a story of an 18th century Irish gentleman-rogue, is the first novel of a great 19th century writer, William Makepeace Thackeray. It shows early signs of a genius that would nourish only after creative struggle and personal adversity. In time, this forgotten book [...]

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (1972) – Review by Richard Schickel

2017-12-21T13:35:23+00:00August 11th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , |

For a director like Stanley Kubrick, a novel like Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange must have seemed an irresistible challenge. Kubrick is essentially a daring imagist, yet he has twice before been tempted by projects that pose powerful problems of language for the film maker.

THE GARDEN OF THE FINZI-CONTINIS – Review by Richard Schickel

2017-08-11T10:21:41+00:00August 11th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

A tragedy of false security by Richard Schickel The film looks as if it had been photographed through the mists of time. Often its characters seem to move with the strange deliberation of figures in a dreamed memory, their outlines softened by the years. Yet its images, its language (and [...]

IL SOGNO DELLA FARFALLA (1994) – Recensione di Paolo Taggi [Segnocinema]

2018-01-26T22:16:56+00:00August 3rd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

di Paolo Taggi A quattordici anni un ragazzo decide di scegliere il silenzio. Da quel momento può fare a meno delle proprie parole e comunica soltanto attraverso i testi scritti da altri. Recita, e sul palcoscenico si esprime attraverso copioni già scritti, che non gli appartengono, nei quali può soltanto [...]

ARANCIA MECCANICA (1972) – Recensione di Pietro Bianchi

2017-08-01T23:18:10+00:00August 1st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

di Pietro Bianchi È difficile dire quale fosse la precisa intenzione del regista Stanley Kubrick quando decise di fare un film, Arancia meccanica, dal romanzo di Anthony Burgess dallo stesso titolo. Per Burgess non ci sono dubbi. Cattolico, avendo sfiorato la morte per una grave malattia, desiderava mostrare i pericoli [...]

2001: FUORI NELLO SPAZIO MA DENTRO LA VITA

2017-06-02T16:49:18+00:00June 2nd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

2001: IL FILM DI STANLEY KUBRICK Il viaggio interplanetario è un viaggio biologico di Lino Curci Sono giorni di scienza, non di fantascienza. Per la prima volta, con l’«Apollo 8», ritorno ha varcato il confine che separa il campo gravitazionale della Terra dalla zona in cui agiscono le forze dì [...]

TAXI DRIVER: UNDERGROUND MAN – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-05-25T13:26:29+00:00May 24th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Pauline Kael Taxi Driver is the fevered story of an outsider in New York—a man who can’t find any point of entry into human society. Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro), the protagonist of Martin Scorsese’s new film, from a script by Paul Schrader, can’t find a life. He’s an [...]

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK: WHIPPED – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-05-08T15:36:56+00:00May 8th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Pauline Kael The marketing executives are the new high priests of the movie business. It's natural. They’re handling important sums of money. And they dispense the money dramatically, in big campaigns that flood out over the country. It’s not unusual for more to be spent on marketing a picture [...]

RAGING BULL: RELIGIOUS PULP, OR THE INCREDIBLE HULK – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-08-01T17:03:55+00:00May 8th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Pauline Kael As Jake la Motta, the former middleweight boxing champ, in Raging Bull, Robert De Niro wears scar tissue and a big, bent nose that deform his face. It’s a miracle that he didn't grow them—he grew' everything else. He developed a thick muscled neck and a fighter [...]

THE GODFATHER – Review by Vincent Canby [The New York Times]

2018-02-02T14:34:57+00:00May 2nd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Taking a best-selling novel of more drive than genius (Mario Puzo's The Godfather), about a subject of something less than common experience (the Mafia), involving an isolated portion of one very particular ethnic group (first-generation and second-generation Italian-Americans), Francis Ford Coppola has made one of the most brutal and moving chronicles of American life ever designed within the limits of popular entertainment.

SEDOTTA E ABBANDONATA (1964) – Recensione di Giovanni Grazzini

2017-04-12T20:36:31+00:00April 11th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

di Giovanni Grazzini Con Sedotta e abbandonata gli affezionati spettatori di Divorzio all'italiana si ritrovano in una Sicilia dominata da un grottesco senso dell'onore, nuovamente si muovono in un clima cupo e afoso con bagliori terrificanti, in cui scoppiano feroci contrasti familiari, e per la seconda volta s'imbattono in una [...]

KUBRICK’S SHINING – Review by Richard T. Jameson [Film Comment]

2018-02-09T17:40:45+00:00March 23rd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Richard T. Jameson Camera comes in low over an immense Western lake, its destination apparently a small island at the center that seems to consist of nothing but treetops. Draw nearer, then sweep over and pass the island, skewing slightly now in search of a central focus at the [...]

EYES WIDE SHUT: WHAT THE CRITICS FAILED TO SEE IN KUBRICK’S LAST FILM – by Lee Siegel [Harper’s Magazine]

2018-02-24T01:20:18+00:00March 9th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Not a single critic, not even those few who claimed to like Eyes Wide Shut, made any attempt to understand the film on its own artistic terms. Instead, the critics denounced the film for not living up to the claims its publicists had made for it.

SCORSESE’S GANGS OF NEW YORK: WHY MYTH MATTERS – by Timothy J. Gilfoyle

2018-01-14T13:24:14+00:00March 9th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Timothy J. Gilfoyle In December 2002, Martin Scorsese’s Gangs of New York opened to critical acclaim. The Chicago Tribune’s Michael Wilmington described the motion picture as “a period epic of hatred and fire,” “a movie of grand reckless ambition,” and “a film burning with creative passion, over-reaching, magnificently wild.” [...]

FUORI ORARIO (1986) – Recensione di Franco La Polla per “Cineforum”

2017-06-05T00:16:17+00:00February 23rd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , , |

«Cambiano le regole. Quando si fanno le ore piccole è zona franca», dice il simpatico barista a Marcy e Paul, offrendo loro la consumazione, per divenire di lì a poco il burbero, inesorabile proprietario che impone al giovane l’ordinazione.

C’ERA UNA VOLTA IN AMERICA: LEONE E LA MEMORIA – di Piera Detassis

2016-12-30T13:04:57+00:00December 30th, 2016|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

L'operazione dei distributori americani di tagliare e rimontare cronologicamente il film di Sergio Leone, C’era una volta in America, è un atto di violenza che riduce in polvere, cancellandolo, il cuore narrativo stesso di questo film

2001: ODISSEA NELLO SPAZIO – Recensione di Giovanni Grazzini

2016-12-05T16:43:22+00:00December 5th, 2016|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Non siamo soli nell'universo. Per convincercene, e umiliare il nostro orgoglio, Stanley Kubrick ha scritto e diretto il più clamoroso e agghiacciante film di fantascienza, o come lui dice, di "prescienza", che sinora sia apparso sugli schermi del sistema solare.

PIER PAOLO PASOLINI: IL VANGELO SECONDO MATTEO – Recensione di Giovanni Grazzini

2018-01-19T18:42:34+00:00November 21st, 2016|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

A ogni altra considerazione sul film che Pasolini ha tratto dal Vangelo secondo Matteo bisogna avanzare una premessa: l'azzardo ha avuto già il suo premio nel coraggio, nella buona fede, nella rigorosa aderenza al testo sacro.

2001: ODISSEA NELLO SPAZIO: Recensione di Fernaldo di Giammatteo

2016-11-20T12:55:40+00:00November 20th, 2016|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

Il caso di 2001: A Space Odyssey, film di enorme successo e di enorme sfortuna, è uno dei più clamorosi. Tanti furono i sofismi che ne accolsero l’uscita da indurre lo stesso Stanley Kubrick a fornire, un poco infastidito, la sua semplice spiegazione

FULL METAL JACKET Recensione di Giovanni Grazzini

2016-11-08T18:47:02+00:00November 8th, 2016|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

di Giovanni Grazzini Il tempo passa ma Kubrick non cambia idea: fra tutte le maniere di morire la guerra continua a sembrargli la più cretina. A trent'anni esatti dal suo Orizzonti di gloria, che resta un pilastro del cinema antimilitarista, e a una ventina da Stranamore, eccolo ancora sparare a [...]

ORIZZONTI DI GLORIA: “FOYER” CRITICO DELLA RIVISTA BIANCO E NERO

2017-02-13T14:35:46+00:00September 23rd, 2016|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , , |

Contributi critici del regista cinematografico Michelangelo Antonioni, del critico letterario Giulio Cattaneo, dello storico del cinema Fausto Montesanti e dello sceneggiatore Giorgio Prosperi. Con una nota critica di Lino Del Fra.