Movie reviews

Come Now, Dr. Strangelove – Review by Andrew Sarris

The great merit of Dr. Strangelove is its bad taste. It is silly to argue that we have the right to say anything we want but that to exercise this right is the height of irresponsibility. Responsible art is dead art, and a sane (no pun intended) film on the bomb would have been a deadly bore.

Renaldo and Clara

Renaldo and Clara (1978) – Review by Pauline Kael

Like Mailer, Dylan is an artist who intended to do something in advance of conventional movies—more poetic, more ‘true’—yet Renaldo and Clara, like Mailer’s Wild 90, Beyond the Law and Maidstone, is marked by an absence of artistic intelligence. The picture hasn’t been thought out in terms of movement or a visual plan.

THE DEER HUNTER (1978) – REVIEW BY STANLEY KAUFFMANN [NEW REPUBLIC]

I submit that, if we are going to be moved to thought and action by The Deer Hunter, it ought to be by the implications of its true subject: the limitations for our society of the traditions of male mystique, the hobbling by sentimentality of a community that, after all the horror, still wants the beeriness of “God Bless America” instead of a moral rigor and growth that might help this country.

The Homosexual Subtext of Tarantino’s “Reservoir Dogs” (1992)

Reservoir Dogs is one of many films, past and present, that either flirt with or fully incorporate homosexual innuendo, expand­ing the vast symbolic field that homosexual­ity embraces. Its subtextual strategy mirrors the longstanding suppression and willful concealment of homoerotic desire in our society.

Accattone (1961) – Recensione di Filippo Sacchi

Credo che ormai sarebbe ingenuo venire a raccontare Accattone al lettore. È da un anno che periodicamente l’Italia è costretta ad occuparsene. Il nostro è un Paese buffo. In nessun altro Paese normale un film come questo sarebbe diventato un affare di Stato.

Rain Man (1988) Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise

RAIN MAN (1988) – REVIEW BY PAULINE KAEL

Rain Man is Dustin Hoffman humping one note on a piano for two hours and eleven minutes. It’s his dream role. As the autistic savant Raymond Babbitt, he’s impenetrable: he doesn’t make eye contact or touch anyone or carry on a conversation; he doesn’t care what anybody thinks of him.

Once Upon a Time in the West – Review by Wim Wenders

I don’t want to see any more Westerns. This one is the very end, the end of a craft. This one is deadly . . . Leone’s film is completely indifferent towards itself. All it shows the unconcerned viewer is the luxury that enabled it to be made

L’Etranger (Lo straniero, 1967) – Review by Margaret Tarratt

Whilst L’Etranger is unlikely to hold a major position in Visconti’s oeuvre, it is in several ways remarkable. It is perhaps too easy to underestimate Visconti’s superb ability to render an authentic sense of period (a quality virtually unique to him amongst Western film directors).

Eyes Wide Shut (1999) Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman

Eyes Wide Shut (1999) – Review by Janet Maslin [The New York Times]

Given the grippingly bizarre settings and situations that Stanley Kubrick’s films favored, what could be more startling than the scene that opens “Eyes Wide Shut”? It’s only the sight of two people who resemble glamorous movie stars getting ready for a black-tie party.

Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors: Storytelling in the Novel and the Film

In the history of Ukrainian literature and cinema one and the same title marks the tarn to the modem. Tini zabutykh predkiv (Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors), a novel by Mykhailo Kotsiubynsky and a film by Serhii Paradzhanov (Sergei Paradjanov), became milestones in the development of their respective art forms.