Ingmar Bergman

Fanny and Alexander (1982)

MOVIE REVIEW: “FANNY AND ALEXANDER” BY INGMAR BERGMAN

Fanny and Alexander may be Bergman’s farewell to film, but it is neither a work of pure nostalgia nor of self- pity and lamentation. It is a loving testament to and celebration of the continuity, infinite possibility, and power of art and the imagination.

CRIES AND WHISPERS: BERGMAN’S WOMEN – Review by Paul D. Zimmerman

Ingmar Bergman—the Swedish creator of The Seventh Seal—long ago abandoned his interest in the mysterious ties between God and man in favor of a broader humanism. His latest film, Cries and Whispers, confronts the realities of the human condition—man’s destiny on “the dark, dirty earth under an empty, cruel Heaven.” Now Bergman seeks his answers in the workings of the human heart alone.

CRIES AND WHISPERS: BERGMAN’S STUDY IN SCARLET – Review by Hollis Alpert

In Ingmar Bergman’s latest film, Cries and Whispers, the predominant tones are red, and from the very beginning of its production he did not hesitate to explain why this is so. He had a dream, he said, and in the dream he saw a group of women dressed in white, whispering together in a room bathed completely in red.

PERSONA: SWEDISH SUMMER – Review by Pauline Kael

Bergman’s movies have almost always had some kind of show within the show: a ballet, a circus, a magic show, a bit of animation, many pieces of plays and even whole plays. In Persona, as in the very early Prison, Bergman involves us in the making of a movie.