Perception: How Hitchcock’s ‘Rope’ Stretches Time

2019-08-15T10:56:46+01:00August 15th, 2019|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , |

The elasticity of time is best appreciated when we are the spectators of a performance, be it a film, a play, a concert or a lecture. The actual duration of the performance and its mental duration are different things. To illustrate the factors that contribute to this varied experience of time, I cannot think of a better example than Alfred Hitchcock’s 1948 film Rope, a technically remarkable work that was shot in continuous, unedited 10-minute takes.

FRENZY: THE HITCHCOCK PROBLEM – Review by William S. Pechter

2018-02-22T09:13:24+00:00February 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

With Frenzy, its director, Alfred Hitchcock, is said to have returned to form, but to what form has he returned? To a resounding orchestral accompaniment, so different from the anxiety-producing music with which Bernard Herrmann contributed so much to Vertigo and Psycho, we move from a panoramic view of the city of London to a Thames-side gathering at which a politician's speech about progress against the river’s pollution is interrupted by the discovery of a floating corpse.