Day for Night (La Nuit Américaine, 1973) – Review by Pauline Kael

2019-06-16T20:58:51+01:00June 16th, 2019|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Day for Night has the Truffaut proportion and grace, and it can please those who have grown up with Truffaut’s films — especially those for whom Jean-Pierre Leaud as Antoine Doinel has become part of their own autobiographies, with Antoine’s compromises and modest successes paralleling their own.

Serpico: The Hero as Freak – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-09-07T09:23:46+01:00September 7th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

What could be a more appropriate subject for a 1973 movie than the ordeal of Frank Serpico, the New York City policeman who became a pariah in the Department because he wouldn’t take bribes? Serpico, whose incorruptibility alienates him from his fellow-officers and turns him into a messianic hippie freak, is a perfect modern-movie hero.

THE KILLING FIELDS (1984): UNREAL – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-23T10:22:48+01:00July 19th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Killing Fields, which is based on Sydney Schanberg’s 1980 Times Magazine article "The Death and Life of Dith Pran,” is by no means a negligible movie. It shows us the Khmer Rouge transforming Cambodia into a nationwide gulag, and the scenes of this genocidal revolution have the breadth and terror of something deeply imagined.

PRIZZI’S HONOR (1985) – by Pauline Kael

2018-07-17T11:02:47+01:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

If John Huston’s name were not on Prizzi’s Honor, I’d have thought a fresh new talent had burst on the scene, and he’d certainly be the hottest new director in Hollywood. The picture has a daring comic tone—it revels voluptuously in the murderous finagling of the members of a Brooklyn Mafia family, and rejoices in their scams.

RAMBO: FIRST BLOOD PART II (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-17T10:23:28+01:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Rambo: First Blood Part II explodes your previous conception of “overwrought”—it’s like a tank sitting on your lap firing at you. Jump-cutting from one would-be high point to another, Rambo is to the action film what Flashdance was to the musical, with one to-be-cherished difference: audiences are laughing at it.

Go to Top