BOOKS

Brave New World: Huxley’s Biology Is Perfectly Right

Joseph Needham, one of the leading biologists of his day, strongly proclaims that Huxley has gotten the science—biology and psychology as well as philosophy—exactly right. Brave New World clearly shows what lies ahead, and it should be required reading especially for those who trust in science to save the world.

Brave New World: The Rise of Mass Man

Huxley’s preoccupation with and concern about the increasing prosperity and numbers of the proletariat found expression in Brave New World. Huxley felt the masses had grown more menacing with population increases and he wrote the novel at a time when it seemed mankind could not recover from the problems of war, depression, and explosive technological progress.

Anne Rice: Playboy Interview (1993)

A candid conversation with the author of The Vampire Chronicles about sex and violence, gays and bloodsuckers, and her helpful fans from the S&M scene

Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

RAY BRADBURY: FAHRENHEIT 451 – AN INTRODUCTION

Book burning and repression of thought and ideas are far from the only themes in Fahrenheit 451. The novel comments on many other aspects of modern life that Bradbury deplores, and it is a striking vindication of his vision that many of the aspects of modern life he deplored at that time are even more pronounced today.

Jack London: Martin Eden – by Franklin Walker

Fifty books remain—the product of Jack London’s fevered spirit and tremendous energy. Of them, none is better than Martin Eden. Like all his books, it is uneven in structure, sometimes clumsy in expression, at times mawkish in tone. Yet it possesses great lasting power, having more vitality today than it did the day it issued from the press.

Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale”: Echoes of Orwell

Virtually from its appear­ance in 1985, Margaret Atwood’s futuristic novel The Handmaid’s Tale has announced its indebtedness to George Orwell’s 1984. Orwell’s nightmarish future is written all over Atwood’s similarly near-future vision of the misogynist theocracy of Gilead.

Children’Novels and the Movies: Watership Down (1972)

Watership Down (1972) came into being as a brief, whimsi­cal tale of rabbits told to amuse Richard Adams’s daughters. Its popularity with them was such that finally he was forced to work out the ramifications of his simple story, and the novel took shape. A labor of love, it was inspired by the desire to tell a good story. The tone of the story reflects this attitude.

Steinbeck’s “Of Mice and Men”: Plot Analysis

On one side of the warm Salinas River the Gabilan Mountains slowly rise; on the other, the valley side, trees line the bank. Through the willows and sycamores a path is worn, by boys coming down from ranches to swim and by tramps coming off the highway…

Brave New World: The Author’s Second Thoughts

In a foreword to Brave New World written fourteen years after the book was first published, the author finds that society is embracing the attitudes he warned against even more quickly than he had originally thought.

Jack London – Martin Eden [Testo Italiano]

Martin Eden è un romanzo dello scrittore statunitense Jack London che racconta la difficile vita di un ragazzo del popolo che lotta disperatamente per diventare uno scrittore, ispirato e sostenuto in questo dal suo amore per la bellezza e per Ruth, una giovane figlia dell’alta borghesia di San Francisco.

Aldous Huxley’s Quest for Values: Religion

Huxley’s ideas have been subjected to much criticism. Those which have been most criticized deal with religion; they have been attacked not only by the critics who have been disturbed by their religious and philosophical implications, but by those who have been bored by Huxley’s occasionally excessive didacticism.

Literature Suppressed on Social Grounds: A Clockwork Orange

A Clockwork Orange is a futuristic warning against both mindless violence and the mechanical reconditioning that is often proposed as society’s solution to its ills. It offers a horrifying view of a future England in which gangs of hoodlums, or “droogs,” roam the streets freely, robbing, fighting, raping, and consuming illegal drugs and alcohol.