THE KILLING FIELDS (1984): UNREAL – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-19T09:15:25+00:00July 19th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Killing Fields, which is based on Sydney Schanberg’s 1980 Times Magazine article "The Death and Life of Dith Pran,” is by no means a negligible movie. It shows us the Khmer Rouge transforming Cambodia into a nationwide gulag, and the scenes of this genocidal revolution have the breadth and terror of something deeply imagined.

PRIZZI’S HONOR (1985) – by Pauline Kael

2018-07-17T11:02:47+00:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

If John Huston’s name were not on Prizzi’s Honor, I’d have thought a fresh new talent had burst on the scene, and he’d certainly be the hottest new director in Hollywood. The picture has a daring comic tone—it revels voluptuously in the murderous finagling of the members of a Brooklyn Mafia family, and rejoices in their scams.

RAMBO: FIRST BLOOD PART II (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-17T10:23:28+00:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Rambo: First Blood Part II explodes your previous conception of “overwrought”—it’s like a tank sitting on your lap firing at you. Jump-cutting from one would-be high point to another, Rambo is to the action film what Flashdance was to the musical, with one to-be-cherished difference: audiences are laughing at it.

INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-09T11:50:11+00:00July 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Pauline Kael The great thing about a tall tale on the screen is that you can be shown the preposterous and the implausible. In Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, the director Steven Spielberg is like a magician whose tricks are so daring they make you laugh. He [...]

THE PLUCK OF ‘BARRY LYNDON’ – Review by Jonathan Rosenbaum

2018-05-09T09:35:18+00:00May 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

So Barry Lyndon is a failure. So what? How many “successes” have you seen lately that are half as interesting or accomplished, that are worth even ten minutes of thought after leaving them? By my own rough count, a smug little piece of engineering like A Clockwork Orange was worth about five. I’m reminded of what Jonas Mekas wrote about Zazie several years ago: “The fact that the film is a failure means nothing. Didn’t God create a failure, too?”

THE ADVENTURES OF BARON MUNCHAUSEN (1988): TOO HIP BY HALF – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-04-23T17:15:13+00:00April 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

What saves Munchausen from mediocrity is that you sense that Gilliam is brainstorming. He goes hippety-hoppety all over the place. The picture is too dry and too busy to be considered merely mediocre. And he has his gifts. He retains an edge of Monty Python’s cranky, warped slapstick, and he has a painter’s eye.

CIMINO, KUBRICK E IL GIOCO DELL’IDENTITÀ E DELLA DIFFERENZA – di Guido Barlozzetti

2018-04-22T13:30:42+00:00April 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Da Nang è lontana da Montelepre. La storia di Salvatore Giuliano e la guerra del Vietnam non si consumano sotto lo stesso cielo. Ma, forse, le traiettorie della "blindatissima" Full Metal Jacket e la parabola fatale del Siciliano attraversano lo "stesso" cinema.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY – Review by John Hofsess

2018-03-08T18:45:20+00:00March 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

2001 no less than Dr. Strangelove is an apocalyptic vision: it i is an alternate future but no less pessimistic. Beneath its austerely beautiful surface an alarm is sounded for us to examine a problem of which Dr. Strangelove was a pronounced symptom: the possibility that man is as much at the mercy of his own artifacts as ever he was of the forces of nature.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY – Reviews by Louise Sweeney and John Allen [The Christian Science Monitor]

2018-03-08T16:13:04+00:00March 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Louise Sweeney, New York-based film critic for The Christian Science Monitor, wrote a generally favorable review following the New York premiere of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Boston staff critic John Allen’s full-page review appeared in the Monitor a month later and M-G-M reprinted it as an ad in a Sunday edition of The New York Times.

POPEYE (1980) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-03-07T08:52:35+00:00March 7th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Sometimes the components of a picture seem miraculously right and you go to it expecting a magical interaction. That's the case with Popeye. But it comes off a little like some of the Jacques Tati comedies, where you can see the intelligence and skill that went into the gags yet you don't hear yourself laughing.