The Undoing – Episode 6 – The Bloody Truth [Transcript]

Season Finale. As the courtroom theater mounts, Grace takes measures to protect herself and her family.
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The Undoing - Episode 6 - The Bloody Truth

Episode aired on November 30, 2020

(distant siren blaring)

(exhales)

(shaky breathing)

Grace: You need to talk to me. Now. Now!

Henry: (whispers) I found it at the outdoor fireplace.

Grace: At the beach house?

Henry: Yeah.

(crashing)

Grace: In the fireplace?

Henry: Yes.

Grace: When?

Henry: Just after we got there.

Grace: And why didn’t you tell me?

Henry: Why do you think?

Grace: Do not answer my question with a question. Why? Why didn’t you tell me?

Henry: (whispers) Because he killed her. (ragged breathing) I didn’t want him to get caught. And you would have turned it over.

(shuddery breaths)

Please… Please…

(thuds)


Jonathan: It’s Alves. He had to have put it there. Planted it.

How would he know to plant it there?

Jonathan: Maybe he followed us.

Grace: Us?

Jonathan: It was a place we went to. Me and Elena.

Franklin: In my family house? You son of a bitch–

Grace: Dad. Dad. Dad!

Franklin: You fucking fuck!

Haley: Stop it. Stop it!

Franklin: Jesus Christ.

Jonathan: This could be a good thing. Alves. His DNA could be all over that. Do we get it tested? This could exonerate me.

Yes?

Henry: It won’t.

Huh?

Henry: It won’t. I ran it through the dishwasher.

What?

Henry: To protect you.

Jonathan: I didn’t kill her!

Haley: Jonathan, shut up. Henry, this is very important for me to help your dad. I absolutely must know the truth. You found it in the outdoor fireplace?

Henry: Yeah.

Haley: When?

Henry: Just after we got to the beach house.

Haley: And you ran it through the dishwasher?

Henry: Twice.

Fuck.

Okay.

Look–

Haley: Nobody talk.

Wait a minute. Henry–

I said, nobody talk. Um… I have no knowledge that that is the actual murder weapon. I am not advising you what to do with it. I also have no obligation to alert the police. Given that it has been run through a dishwasher, I have no reason to believe that it will be of any evidentiary value.

Franklin: Well, of course it–

Haley: Listen to me. Should this hammer come to light, it is game over. It’s one too many coincidences to account for. Add to that, Henry could be arrested for obstruction of justice.

No, they wouldn’t arrest an innocent boy for protecting his father.

They can, and they likely will.

Grace: They could arrest Henry? They can blame Henry?

They can, and they will. Add to that, they would traumatize the shit out of him.

(kisses)

Ugh. (clears throat) (breathes deeply) It is my advice… It is my advice that you do not turn it over.

Are you kidding me?

Haley: Franklin, you hired me to defend your son-in-law. All of you understand, now is not the time. We’re in the middle of a trial. We can tend to our ethical egos once this is all over.

So, all right. What…? What should I do with it?

(footsteps)

Haley: I can neither advise nor instruct you to conceal or destroy.

Franklin: That is not an answer, Haley.

Haley: I can neither advise nor instruct you to conceal or destroy.

I need to talk to my wife. Alone. Now. Grace.

Go to your room. Wait in your room.

(footsteps departing)

(door closes)

Jonathan: Could it be?

Grace: What?

Jonathan: Well, it’s the only other explanation, Grace.

Grace: What?

Jonathan: Well, I think you’re asking yourself the same question. I mean, he knew about me and Elena. Saw us at school. Could have been very, very upset. Traumatized more than we know. I mean, could, could he have gone there that night for some reason, and– Seen me with her? And I don’t know. Just…

Grace: Are you actually asking me, do I think our son beat a woman to death?

Jonathan: Well, he had the weapon.

Grace: No. No.

Jonathan: He, he had the weapon.

Grace: No.

Jonathan: He was carrying it around with him.

Grace: It is not possible. No. No.

Jonathan: Hiding it. He was hiding it for three months. Why’d he put it through a dishwasher?

Grace: He… He wants to protect you. He believes you did it.

Jonathan: Everyone assumes they know their own kid.

Grace: Are you actually–

Jonathan: But maybe they, maybe they don’t.

Grace: Are you actually accusing our son…

Jonathan: No, I’m not. I’m not. I’m just thinking.

Grace: …of committing this crime? Do not–

Jonathan: I’m thinking. My mind is just fucking spinning. That’s all!

Grace: In despicable directions. (exhales sharply) I need you to leave.

Jonathan: I’m sorry.

(door slams)


Hey.

Henry: F-f-fuck you.

Jonathan: Don’t talk to me like that.

Henry: You’re accusing me of doing this.

Jonathan: I’m not. I’m not.

Henry: I fucking heard you!

(door closes)

Jonathan: No, no, no, Hen. What you heard was my mind running in a way which at the moment is completely bonkers. It’s, it’s out of control. Sit down. Come on. Talk to me. I’m under siege here, and I’m under siege. Everyone seems to think I did this thing, and I didn’t.

Henry: You blamed me.

Jonathan: That’s not me in this. That is a desperate man. That’s not the real Dad. But I promise you this. If I survive this ordeal, and I fucking well will, the real me will be back. And the real us will be back. And you and I will go on the much-advertised road trip. Deux. Yeah? I love you, mate. I’m sorry.

(distant thunder crashes)

Jonathan: Come here. I love you. I love you.  (kisses) Come here.

(gasps, kisses)


(thunder crashing)

(rain pouring)

Franklin: Jesus Christ. If that man goes free, he will be in your life. He will be in your son’s life. Good God, Grace. You have always seen things so clearly. Seen exactly how they will play out. How can you not see this now? Oh. Oh, God.

Grace: (whispers) I do see. I’ll fix this.

(thunder rumbling)


Newscaster: To put the defendant on the stand, it’s risky, and likely a sign Haley Fitzgerald feels she has no choice. On the other hand, the doctor’s primetime news interview was clearly compelling. She may very well feel that her client is the secret sauce to an acquittal. One thing we know for a certainty, tomorrow promises to deliver high theater.

♪♪

Haley: I’m not loving the vibe here, team.

We’re fine.

Haley: Uh-huh. Again, no emotion whatsoever. Not even a hint.

Be inhuman. I get it.

Haley: Not my point.

Grace: What is your point?

Haley: My point is your every reaction will be used against you. If you wince, he’s a monster. If you smile, you don’t care. If you cry, you’re faking it. You, on the other hand, you hide nothing. You let ’em see everything.

Yeah.

Haley: Chins up. Eyes down.

(seatbelt unclicks)

Haley: And hold fucking hands.

(clamoring, shouting)

(camera shutters clicking)


(camera shutter clicks)

Haley: When you consider the totality of all the circumstances, together with some of the facts…

Jonathan: Um, they’re awful. I lied to my wife, which makes me a liar. I was unfaithful, which makes me a cheat. My semen was found inside the victim, which makes me a suspect. I deserve those labels. But not murderer. I didn’t kill Elena. We made love. I left. I returned. I found her dead.

Haley: But you understand our problem. We only have your word. And as you’ve admitted, you lie.

Jonathan: Well, there is no evidence of me ever being violent. Ever. In fact, I have attempted to devote my entire life to what might be called… the antithesis of violence. Healing. As well as, I hope, empathy and compassion. I helped to heal Elena and Fernando’s son, Miguel.

Haley: Can we talk about that? What was his condition? Miguel’s condition?

Jonathan: He had what’s called Wilms tumor. It’s cancer of the kidney. Most common among children, and Miguel bore that statistical brunt.

Haley: What was his treatment?

Jonathan: Well, he was unlucky in that normal medical practice had failed. I… used to lead a team that specialized in a procedure called autologous bone marrow transplant. It’s a long, and relatively new process, but happily, it was entirely successful in Miguel’s case. By the end, we’d all become quite close. Cancer can do that. There’s been much discussion of… my loving his mother. But I also quite love him.

Haley: Miguel.

Jonathan: Yeah, he became like a son, which is not advisable. Um, pediatric oncologists becoming too close to their patients. Well, it’s a recipe for depression, or if not, utter personal doom, but, uh, I found I had no choice more times than not. And I certainly had no choice with Miguel. He’s… He’s a remarkable young man.

Haley: You keep calling him a man.

Jonathan: Yeah, he’s a young boy. But to fight the cancer he did, with the ferocity he showed, and the good humor, there’s a man in there, I assure you.

Haley: After the surgery, during chemotherapy, you often slept in his hospital room.

Jonathan: Well, as I say, I’d become very attached. There were some touch-and-go moments and I wasn’t gonna lose him. I was very determined about that. Uh, another reason, of course, why…

Another reason what?

Jonathan: Well, he was like a son. What was done to his mother… I could never do such a thing. Not to her, and… not to him.

(gasps)

Haley: Thank you.

Stamper: You discovered Miguel’s mother like this.

Jonathan: I did, yeah.

Stamper: And when the police found her the next morning, when they came looking to ask you questions, uh, where were you then?

Jonathan: Near Lake George, upstate New York, in a motel.

Stamper: How’d you get there?

Jonathan: I drove.

Stamper: Hmm. (exhales) You say you loved Elena Alves.

Jonathan: Yeah.

Stamper: You discovered her like this. May I ask you to look at the screen, please? Sir? A woman you loved. A woman whose son was like a son to you. You didn’t call the police, or an ambulance?

Jonathan: Well, first of all, I knew she was dead.

Stamper: Yes, so, off to Lake George, then.

Jonathan: And I panicked, you see. I panicked. I panicked. I panicked.

Stamper: You panicked, and went straight to Lake George from the scene.

Jonathan: No, I went the next morning.

Stamper: Oh, but, where did you go that night?

Jonathan: I went home.

Stamper: Sorry?

Jonathan: I went home.

Stamper: And did what?

Jonathan: I went to bed.

Stamper: You left your bludgeoned-to-death lover, went home, and went to bed.

Jonathan: I was terrified. I was terrified of being blamed. And that my infidelity would be exposed. And I… made a stupid decision.

Stamper: But you’re not a stupid man. You’re an acclaimed oncologist. Well-versed in making life-or-death calls under extreme stress. The decision you made here… was to flee.

Jonathan: I knew how it looked. I knew how it looked then, as I know how it looks now. If not me, then who? Well, it’s not me. I might be the easy answer, but I’m not the right answer.

Stamper: The, um, clothes you were wearing that night, a tuxedo, I believe, what became of the tuxedo?

Jonathan: I took it to the dry cleaner.

Stamper: You took it to the dry cleaners?

(spraying)

Stamper: When?

Jonathan: On the way to Lake George.

(spraying)

Stamper: You took it to the dry cleaners on your way to Lake George.

(clamoring)

(camera shutters clicking)

(commotion, chattering)


(leaves rustling)

(birds chirping)

Grace: Henry?

Henry: (sniffles) Yeah?

(exhales sharply)

Grace: I cannot fathom how you’re bearing up through all of this. (sighs) Are you okay? Hmm? I know how close you and your dad are.

Henry: Dad created this.

Grace: What do you think about what he said about trying to fix this family? Do you hope for that?

Henry: Do you hope for that?

Grace: (scoffs) You are answering a question with a question again.

Henry: Yeah. And I’d like you to answer first. Do you hope for that?

(kisses)

Grace: (whispers) I want what’s best for you.


(phone jingling)

Hi.

Grace (over phone): Hey, it’s me.

Will you come for a walk with me?

Sylvia (over phone): What, now, before breakfast? (sighs) Yeah, can you give me, like, 30? That’s when Rosana gets here.

I need to talk to you, and I need you to do something for me.

(inaudible)


(commotion, shouting)

Jonathan (whispers): Why the same cop? Why not call his partner?

Judge Shepley: Okay, Ms. Fitzgerald, you’ve still got the ball.

Thanks, Your Honor. At this time, the defense would like to call… Miguel Alves.

(spectators murmuring)

Your Honor–

He’s on the witness list. Yours, in fact.

Stamper: This witness was never included on our pre-trial–

He’s on your list. And he’s here, I suspect, as a prop.

Fernando: If it gets too much, I’ll make it stop. Okay? I’m here for you. I’m sorry. (kisses) Love you.

(spectators murmuring)

Do you swear that the testimony you’re about to give is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?

Yes.

Bailiff: State your name, please.

Miguel Alves.

Okay, Miguel. Have a seat.

Hi, Miguel. I’m really sorry to put you on the spot like this. This has been all pretty terrible. But nothing can be as bad as losing your mom, I bet. I see you looking at your dad. And that’s okay. And I promise if any of this gets too hard, or too scary, you tell me, okay? We can stop. We can take a breath.

Okay.

And I also promise that I’ll keep this very short. I really only have two questions. Or I should say, questions about two things. First, the night your mom died, you were home with your dad?

Miguel: And my sister.

Haley: Where was your mom?

She went to a school fundraiser thing. An auction.

Haley: She went to the auction? Okay. Do you remember offhand when you went to bed?

Around nine o’clock.

Nine o’clock? You fairly sure?

That’s my bedtime. My father’s really strict about it.

Haley: You have your own bedroom?

Miguel: Yes.

Haley: And where does your baby sister sleep?

Miguel: In my parents’ room.

Haley: So, you went to bed around nine. Do you remember what time you woke up? 6:30. I have an alarm clock for school.

Haley: Okay. And between nine o’clock when you went to bed, and around 6:30 when you woke up, did you get up, or wake up, in between?

No.

You were asleep the whole time?

Miguel: I think. I wake up sometimes when I get thirsty or I need to pee.

Haley: Did that happen that night?

I don’t think so. But I can’t really remember.

Haley: That’s fair. So, it could have been that you slept the whole night through, from around nine, to around 6:30. Right?

I guess.

Haley: Okay. My next question is a little harder. Did your mom and dad ever get upset with each other? Argue?

Sometimes.

Haley: Did they ever yell at each other when they got upset?

Sometimes.

Scream? Did they fight a lot?

(inaudible)

(whispers): I don’t know.

Haley: Okay. Had they been fighting a little more than usual shortly before she died?

I don’t know.

Haley: Did it ever frighten you when they would argue? Miguel? Did you ever tell anyone that it was really scary when your mom and dad fought?

I told… (whispers): one of… my teachers.

Haley: Hey. Sorry. You know what? Why don’t we call it quits right here? You did great.

Judge Shepley: Ms. Stamper?

I have nothing, Your Honor.

Judge Shepley: Thank you, Miguel. You may step down now.

(spectators murmuring)


(thudding)

(toilet flushes)

Hey.

Hi.

That was obscene.

I know.

Do you?

(paper towel holder thudding)

(crumpling)

Really?

(drying hands)

You okay?

Yeah. I’m fine. And you?

(door thuds open)

Hey, hey, hey.

How dare you?

Haley: Mr. Alves–

You people are fucking vile!

Jonathan: Officer!

Haley: You cannot be here.

You should be ashamed!

Haley: Don’t make me call security.

Come on, Fernando.

(Fernando yells)

(crashing)

Fucking vile!

Jonathan: Officer!

Out! Let’s go! Not here.

(door closes)

You okay?

Haley: Are you sure?

(sighs)

So now what? Is that it? Do we…? We rest?

(sighs) Or maybe we still go to Mendoza. It’s close. No, it’s good. I like where we are.

What about me? (exhales sharply) You’ve always said I’m the most reliable narrator. I’m… I’m… I’m willing to testify. You said the jury will relate to me. (exhales)

Haley: Grace. I can’t put your ambivalence on display.

Grace: Ambivalence? (sighs) I see. I’m just gonna tell the truth.

But what is your truth? I’m having a little trouble tracking it.

(scoffs) I don’t believe you could have done this. I’ll say that. I’m willing to say that. I’ll testify to that.

Thank you. Grace.

(Grace exhales)


(thuds)

Franklin: To have an affair, that’s human. To strike at someone in an… an act of passion, or anger, that’s human. But to bludgeon someone to death, and keep on bludgeoning them long after they are dead, that is a monster, Grace. That is a monster.

(breathes heavily)

Thank you… for your kindness.


Bailiff: Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?

Grace: I do.

Bailiff: Please state your name for the record.

Grace: Grace Reinhart Fraser.

Bailiff: Be seated.

(heels clicking)

Haley: Dr. Fraser. May I call you Grace?

Grace: Yes.

You’re a doctor.

Grace: I am.

Could you tell us your specialty?

Grace: I’m a clinical psychologist. I have a PhD in psychology that I got from Harvard University.

And that’s where you met your husband.

Grace: It is. We met in 2002. And we were married in 2005.

You’ve been happily married.

Grace: Until recently, yes.

Haley: Yes. I won’t ask you to recite the events that brought you here today.

Grace: I appreciate that.

You and your husband are still together.

Grace: Yes. We are.

Haley: Prior to the night that Elena Alves was killed, did you know that she and Jonathan were romantically involved?

Grace: I did not.

Haley: We’ve heard testimony of you all being at a school fundraiser together. And that he left early. Why did he leave, to your knowledge?

Grace: My knowledge then was that he left because of an emergency with a patient. My knowledge subsequently and now is that he left because of her.

Her, being Elena, the victim?

Grace: Yes.

He was in love with her. Perhaps still is. That must be difficult.

Grace: Yes, it is.

And yet you stand by him, giving testimony on his behalf today.

Grace: Because he could not have done this.

How do you know that?

Grace: We’ve been married for 14 years. We’ve been together for 17 years. I’ve been able to intimately observe who and what he is. I’m a clinical psychologist. I have an expertise in brain cognition. I have a skill set that allows me to read people. To diagnose them, if you will.

You didn’t know about his infidelity?

Grace: It’s one thing to be fooled by his adultery. To be duped by who and what he fundamentally is–

And what is he?

Grace: He is… Perhaps most profoundly, I would say he’s a healer. He, he saves people’s lives. He, he cures children of cancer. His whole esteem is inextricably bound up with that. Preserving human life. The idea that he would take one is simply untenable.

Haley: You would know as a psychologist that many law-abiding, high-functioning people, including doctors, have the capacity to snap.

Grace: I’ve never, ever observed Jonathan to be violent. Not even once. He is a gentle man. He is a man of empathy. It is not within him to do what he has been accused of.

Thank you.

(exhales)

(spectators murmuring)

Stamper: You love him.

Grace: I do.

Is there anyone you love more?

Grace: My son. Henry.

Stamper: Yes. Yes, of course. I cannot imagine his ordeal. For a, a 12-year-old, to see his father accused of murder, I bet you wish you could just wave a wand for Henry’s sake. Give his, his father back to him.

Grace: That’s not what I’m doing here.

Are you familiar with the term confirmation bias?

Grace: Yes. Of course.

What, what is it?

Grace: It’s, um… (chuckles) It’s the tendency to see things according to your own preconceived notions.

Stamper: The defendant is the love of your life. He’s the father of your child. To see him as a murderer…

Grace: My testimony has been truthful.

Stamper: Really? You testified that you’ve never known your husband to be violent. That was truthful?

Grace: Yes.

Has he ever grabbed you by the neck?

Grace: If you’re referring, um, if you’re referring to the night that he came to the beach house, that–

Stamper: Yes, that is the night. I’m referring to the night he broke into the beach house. Suddenly came up on you from behind, and grabbed you.

Grace: He wanted to talk to me, and… He put both his hands on me, and, and he, he wanted to prevent me from yelling, because he didn’t want to scare me, and he didn’t want to scare my son, who was sleeping upstairs. And that’s–

But did you– Did you tell Detective Mendoza that… you weren’t sure he wouldn’t kill you?

Grace: I mean, I was terrified in the moment, and all of a sudden, he was there, and… I was startled.

Stamper: So the testimony you gave earlier, that your husband could never be violent, that was incorrect.

Grace: My senses were overwhelmed in the moment briefly by fear. I quickly realized I wasn’t in any real danger.

You quickly realized that before or after you called 9-1-1?

(exhales)

Grace (on recording): My name is Grace Fraser. My husband has just broken in. He’s a fugitive. He’s wanted for murder. His name is Jonathan Fraser. I’m at 361 Beachway, Beachway Drive, and I’m fucking terrified, and I need you to hurry. Get here quickly. (sobbing): Please.

Grace: As I said, I was terrified. I was terrified in the moment. I know my husband, and I know–

You know his family?

Grace: What?

His family. His, uh, mom. His dad. You know them?

Grace: Not well. He’s estranged from his family.

Stamper: Estranged? Do you know why?

Grace: There was an incident.

What kind of incident?

Grace: When Jonathan was 14, he was babysitting his four-year-old sister, and she somehow got out of the house and she was struck and killed by a car. He was blamed by his parents.

Stamper: And-and that’s the source of the estrangement?

Grace: Yes.

Yes. Uh, did you ever talk to Jonathan’s mother or father about this?

Grace: I spoke to his mother.

Stamper: When?

Grace: Recently. About a week ago.

And what did she tell you?

Objection. Hearsay.

Declaration against interest.

I’ll allow it.

Please. What did she tell you?

Grace: Mainly just that. That, um… That somehow, the sister got out of the house, and then the… The tragedy happened.

Did she talk about Jonathan’s trauma?

Haley: Objection.

Overruled.

Stamper: What did the defendant’s mother tell you regarding the, the trauma he suffered as a result of his sister’s death?

Grace: She said that he suffered… no trauma.

(spectators murmuring)

Stamper: In fact, she told you Jonathan suffered from neither guilt nor grief. Isn’t that correct?

Objection! This is hearsay.

Stamper: It’s a declaration against interest.

She’s his mother, and–

There’s been no showing of any support–

And also offering to impeach. This witness testified under oath that she knows the defendant to be a person of empathy, when she has reason–

Your Honor!

The objection is noted and overruled.

(chair clatters)

Stamper: Yes or no? The defendant’s mother told you that Jonathan suffered neither guilt nor grief in reaction to his four-year-old sister’s death.

Judge Shepley: Please answer the question, doctor.

Grace: Yes.

No grief?

Grace: She kept waiting for it, but… She said they surrounded him with family support. That they… That they were certain once the shock wore off the suffering would begin. But it didn’t. It never came.

Stamper: Did she say anything else?

Grace: Uh… It’s just her opinion. It’s not necessarily what–

Judge Shepley: We can regard it as such. Please answer the question.

Stamper: What else did she say?

Grace: She said… that it’s her belief that Jonathan… doesn’t know how to suffer. That he’s not capable of remorse. Or contrition.

Ever tell anyone that you believed your husband to suffer from narcissistic personality disorder?

Your Honor, objection!

Judge Shepley: Overruled.

Haley: Your Honor, in addition to being prejudicial, this is irrelevant.

Stamper: It goes to impeach. I’m sorry, Your Honor, but this witness took the stand to vouch for the defendant, for his innocence. When in fact, she can vouch for neither.

Haley: Objection!

Judge Shepley: Overruled. Sit down, Ms. Fitzgerald.

Stamper: Eyes to me, doctor. Eyes to me. You told your friend, Sylvia Steinetz, that you believed your husband suffered from narcissistic personality disorder.

Grace: It wasn’t a professional diagnosis.

Stamper: But your opinion, as his wife. As a clinical psychologist. What are the traits of narcissistic personality disorder?

Grace: Grandiosity, mostly.

What else? What else?

Grace: Lack of empathy.

Lack of empathy. So your testimony that you knew him to be a man of empathy, that was a lie. One you told us. And one you told yourself. Wasn’t it?

Grace: I don’t know what you mean by that.

Stamper: Really? Doctor, in your practice, do you not tell patients that sometimes they so want to believe in their partners that they… They choose to un-know things. Un-see things. That sometimes the truth of who and what they married gets distorted by the desperation of what they want to be married to. That, that’s a real phenomenon. Isn’t it, Dr. Fraser? People being blind to the reality of their spouses. You tell your patients that all the time. Don’t you?

Grace: I know who and what I married.

Stamper: Yes. Yes, I think you do.

Your Honor, I move for a mistrial. This is hearsay. It’s prejudicial beyond the pale. It’s unfair surprise and outrageous!

Judge Shepley: If she were a prosecution witness, I might go for that. But she’s not. She’s a defense witness. You put her up there. The damage done here was done by you.

You should know…

Judge Shepley: Dr. Fraser, take your seat, please.

…that most of what has been said in the last 10 minutes is a lie!

Judge Shepley: Take your seat. You may step down now.

(spectators murmuring)


Franklin: I so love you, Grace.

Sylvia: Grace? Grace.

Well done, Haley. Well done. She fucked us. She fucked us.

We’ll move for a mistrial.

You won’t. You tried that just now, and he shut you down. It’s over. She fucked us.

Jonathan–

And you let it happen.

I let it happen? Jonathan, she was with you. She was in your camp. And you lost her. Because you didn’t get rid of the fucking hammer. You hear that? You didn’t get rid of the fucking hammer. How stupid can you get?

(spectators chattering)


Newscaster: She absolutely did it on purpose. She was in cahoots with the prosecution.

Newscaster 2: If the prosecutor had called her, the defense could have shut her down on spousal privilege. But because the defense called Grace Fraser, the privilege was deemed waived. And she became fair game to impeach. Brilliant. The bombshell she dropped–

(phone clicks off)

(rain pattering)

She took him down on purpose.

Franklin: What’d you want her to do? Lie? She could always have turned over the hammer. But that would have taken you down. Goodbye, Reardon. Hello, juvenile hall.

(phone clicks)

(scoffs) You got a text. The morality lesson is suspended.


(door opens)

(gasps)

(Elena grunts)

(both breathing heavily)

(moans softly)

(passionate moaning)


Newscaster: Bad news for gamblers. The oddsmakers in Las Vegas have suspended any further betting on the trial’s outcome, as Dr. Fraser’s conviction seems all but assured.

(birds chirping)

(brushing teeth)

(phone buzzing)

(tapping on screen)

(phone bloops)

(sets phone down)


(helicopter whirring)

(clamoring, shouting)

Where’s Jonathan?

Franklin: Hmm?

Haley: He’s not here. He’s not answering my calls. Have you heard from him?

(phone chimes)

Franklin: Of course I haven’t heard from him. That son of a bitch. I warned him, but–

Henry didn’t show up at school.

Didn’t show up at school?

Franklin: Get the police, Haley. Oh, darling.

Henry: Dad, are we really going for breakfast?

Jonathan: Give me the phone. Give me the phone. Thanks. (laughs) The look on your face is brilliant. (laughs) It’s going off though. Try to stay calm.

(phone thuds on floor)

Henry: You can’t do this, Dad.

Jonathan: I’m not really doing anything, am I? Going for a drive with my son?

(laughs)

Elena: Your wife. She’s great. She’s been so kind to me, you know? I think we had a real connection. We’re having tea tomorrow, with the kids, I think. Henry could be great for Miguel. Like an older brother.

You stay away from my family. If you go anywhere near my family again, either my wife, or my son, I will hurt you. I will fucking hurt you.

You will never hurt me. And you will never leave me, Jonathan.

So go on, then. How’s Rosenbaum? How’s his bum?

Captain Chappell: The New York State Special Victims Unit has issued an Amber Alert for 12-year-old Henry Fraser. Five-feet, one-inch tall, 110 pounds. He’s Caucasian, with dark brown hair. Was last seen wearing a school uniform– gray pants, blue blazer.

Franklin: Let’s go, Billy.

Captain Chappell: We’re looking for a late model gray Range Rover. Vehicle was recorded exiting the island of Manhattan along the Henry Hudson Parkway. We have reason to believe that vehicle’s headed for the Canadian border. We’ve requested interstate activation, and have notified Canadian border services. Dr. Jonathan Fraser should be considered armed, and extremely dangerous. If you have any information, we ask that you dial 9-1-1…

Can you just tell me where we’re going, please?

Not sure. (chuckles) I’m not sure, mate. It’s a… It’s a magical mystery tour. It’s the long-promised road trip two. I just thought, you know, that it’d be our last chance to do it.

Dad, come on. We can’t go on a road trip right now.

Come on, come on, come on, come on. Sit back. Relax. Enjoy yourself. Sing a song. What’s that song you used to sing when you were little? How do you– Um…

Uh… ♪ With my hands on myself ♪ That one.

♪ What have we here ♪

♪ These are my eye peepers, nothing to fear ♪

♪ Eye peepers, brain box and wibbly-wobbly-woos ♪

Both: ♪ That’s what they taught me when I went to school ♪

Elena: You will never hurt me.

Really?

(fearful scream)

Are you sure?

(spits, gasps)

Did that hurt, darling? Did it?

(gasping)

(thwacks)

Did that fucking hurt?

Elena: Stop!

Both: ♪ My hands on myself ♪

♪ What have we here ♪

♪ This is my– ♪

♪ Bread basket ♪

Go on.

♪ Nothing to fear ♪

Both: ♪ Bread basket, nose wiper ♪

♪ Eye peeper, brain box and wibbly-wobbly-woos ♪

♪ That’s what they taught me when I went to ♪

(vibrating): ♪ School ♪

You will never leave me.

(whispers): You will never leave me.

Really?

You will never–

(thwacks)

(thuds)

(keys jangle)

I just left you.

(breathes shakily, sniffles)

(chuckling)

Pilot: The police got him on 202. They’re ten miles out.

(helicopters whirring)

Jonathan: Right. I say, it is very nearly fried clam o’clock.

Fried clams?

But not fried clams as you know them, Earthling. These are the fried clams from the great Bollie’s of Albany. The best fried clams in the universe.

Dad, we can’t go get fried clams. You need to pull over and let me out.

They’re Ipswich clams as well, which means they’re big, fat bastards, as any self-respecting clam should be.

Dad!

Jesus!

SO WHY DON’T WE JUST DO THIS? Sorry. Sorry. See, that can happen. That can happen. We can just… lose ourselves sometimes. We become… you know, other. Could be panic, or anger, or… Or love, sometimes. We lose ourselves. But it doesn’t undo who we are in our entirety. You should know that. You got that? So they’re gonna say that this is my legacy, and they can go fuck themselves, be– sorry– because it’s not my legacy. My legacy… is you. And my patients, and your mum. Yeah?

You murdered a person, Dad.

(Elena sniffles, breathes shakily)

(clattering)

(yells frantically)

(Jonathan grunts)

Really? Yeah?

(Elena pants)

Yeah?

(Elena screams)

(grunts)

(Elena yells)

(thwacks)

(grunts)

(grunts)

(Elena panting)

(whispers): Please. Please.

(thwacks)

(thwacks)

(sniffles)

(loud, rhythmic thwacks)

(panting)

You murdered a person.

Not the real me. Not the Dad you know.

(door thuds closed)

(sirens blaring)

It’s all right. It’s all right. It’s okay.

Henry: Dad, stop!

(helicopter whirring)

(sirens blaring)

Dad, stop!

Jonathan: Yeah, in a minute.

Stop the car.

In a minute. I want every last second with you, my friend.

You have to stop. You have to pull over and let me out, Dad. Dad, please. Please.

Every last second. Fuck ’em. Fuck ’em!

(tense music playing)

Dad, come on. Come on, you can’t do this.

This is nothing to be scared of.

It’s gonna make it worse.

Nothing to be– Shut up!

Henry: Just please. Just let me out. Please.

(sirens blaring)

(tense music playing)

Well, there it is. Dead ahead. That, my friend, is the Wurts Street Bridge. Once a thing of majestic beauty. Now… not so much, huh? What does that remind you of?

Dad. The light is red, Dad. Dad, it’s a red light. Dad. Dad! Dad!

(Grace yells)

(horn blares)

Please don’t hurt my son. Please don’t hurt my son.

Dad, what the fuck are you doing?

Jonathan: So remember.

Dad.

It’s you, my patients, and your mum.

Dad. Dad!

That’s my legacy. What’s my legacy?

(yelling) Dad! Get back in the lane!

(horn blaring, brakes screech)

We gotta get down there. Can you land this thing? Land it.

Dad. Dad. Dad. Dad! Dad! (screaming): Dad! Dad! Dad, no! No! No! Dad, don’t do this! Dad!

Jonathan: No!

Henry: Don’t run from it!

No!

Henry: Don’t run from it! Just get back in the car.

Grace: Can I get out? Can I open the door?

Franklin: Get out, get out. Open the door!

No! Stop!

(yelps)

Henry: Dad!

Jonathan, no!

Ma’am, you can’t go–

Stop!

You can’t go through.

Stop!

I love you.

Grace: Jonathan!

Henry. Stop! Henry! Please! Henry, I’m coming!

Stop! Stop! Look at me! Jonathan, no! Henry! Jonathan! Henry! Jonathan! Henry! (panting)

Jonathan: It’s all right.

Henry.

(gasps)

Jonathan: Sorry. I’m so sorry.

(Grace panting)

Grace, I’m sorry. I’m sorry.

(gasps)

Grace, come here. Come here. Give me a hug. Grace!

Henry!

Run.

Jonathan: Grace! Henry! Grace!

(officers yelling, indistinct)

(commotion, shouting)

(handcuffs clicking)

(helicopter whirring)

Pilot: All right, Henry. Ready to go, ma’am?


(THUNDER RUMBLING)

NICOLE KIDMAN: David and Susanne are concocting this extraordinary crescendo. And The Undoing came and hit us like a thunderbolt, because while it was being written, we didn’t know how it was going to end.

♪ (MELANCHOLY MUSIC PLAYS) ♪

Because of everybody rooting for Jonathan, it needed to end in big time insanity.

POLICE CHIEF: The New York State Special Victims Unit has issued an Amber Alert for 12-year-old Henry Fraser. Dr. Jonathan Fraser should be considered armed and extremely dangerous.

HUGH GRANT: Jonathan can’t really tolerate the fact that he’s been caught, and above all, that the people who adored him most are going to despise him forever. And the son bit is particularly hard for him, ’cause if his boy doesn’t love and admire him, no one does.

You murdered a person, Dad.

Not the real me. Not the Dad you know.

Henry’s in shock, realizing that his dad was the murderer after all, and when he speeds up down the road and a truck almost hits them, there’s definitely a break in their bond, because of the sheer terror that he’s put him through.

Dad, it’s a red light. Dad. Dad!

(SCREAMS)

(TRUCK HORN BLARES)

Please don’t hurt my son.

NICOLE KIDMAN: The idea of running to save your child, I could’ve done that and I did do it over and over and over again.

Ma’am, you can’t go through!

Stop!

You can’t go through!

Stop! Henry! Let go of him!

At the end, Henry discovered something about how much the truth matters and when they’re on the bridge, he goes to his mom, and he doesn’t really look back.

Henry! (SCREAMS) Grace!

OFFICER: Get on your knees!

HUGH: Jonathan’s cornered, and his family’s flying away in a helicopter, but I think the main question is, “Was it all a front?” Did Jonathan really love them? Or did he just love them loving him? And it’s chilling.

NICOLE: I love the end shot, because there’s a woman who’s now got the next stage of her life. And what does that mean? There’s a freedom in that.

Grace captured her own demon. She has managed to put justice in some sort of order.

NICOLE KIDMAN: It’s not all tied up in a neat bow, which I find very truthful. “But I’ve moved on. Or have I?”

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