Francis Ford Coppola

THE GODFATHER (1972) – Review by Andrew Sarris

I am convinced that The Godfather could have been a more profound film if Coppola had shown more interest (and perhaps more courage) in those sections of the book which treated crime as an extension of capitalism and as the sine qua non of showbiz.

THE GODFATHER WARS – by Mark Seal

Mark Seal recalls how the clash of Hollywood sharks, Mafia kingpins, and cinematic geniuses shaped the Hollywood masterpiece ‘The Godfather’

THE GODFATHER – Review by Vincent Canby [The New York Times]

Taking a best-selling novel of more drive than genius (Mario Puzo’s The Godfather), about a subject of something less than common experience (the Mafia), involving an isolated portion of one very particular ethnic group (first-generation and second-generation Italian-Americans), Francis Ford Coppola has made one of the most brutal and moving chronicles of American life ever designed within the limits of popular entertainment.

Apocalypse Now (1979): Joseph Conrad and the Television War

“The most important thing I wanted to do in the making of Apocalypse Now was to create a film experience that would give its audience a sense of the horror, the madness, the sensuousness, and the moral dilemma of the Vietnam war. “