Tenet (2020)

Tenet (2020) – Transcript

Armed with only one word, Tenet, and fighting for the survival of the entire world, a Protagonist journeys through a twilight world of international espionage on a mission that will unfold in something beyond real time.

A Passage to India (1984)

A PASSAGE TO INDIA – REVIEW BY PAULINE KAEL

The movie version, adapted, directed, and edited by David Lean, is an admirable piece of work. Lean doesn’t get in over his head by trying for the full range of the book’s mysticism, but Forster got to him.

Empire of the Sun (1987)

EMPIRE OF THE SUN – REVIEW BY PAULINE KAEL

Empire of the Sun begins majestically and stays strong for perhaps forty-five minutes. It’s so gorgeously big you want to laugh in pleasure. Steven Spielberg takes over Shanghai and makes it his city. And then, first in brief patches and then in longer ones, his directing goes terribly wrong.

Ian Fleming

UMBERTO ECO: THE NARRATIVE STRUCTURE IN IAN FLEMING

In the following excerpt, originally published in Italian in 1965, Eco offers a detailed examination of the narra­tive formula that Fleming employed in all the Bond novels, a strategy Eco regards as “the basis of the suc­cess of the ‘007’ saga. ”

The Man Who Would Be King

THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING – REVIEW BY PAULINE KAEL

John Huston’s The Man Who Would Be King, based on the Rudyard Kipling short story, is an exhilaratingly farfetched adventure fantasy about two roughneck con men, Danny and Peachy (Sean Connery and Michael Caine), in Victoria’s India, who decide to conquer a barbarous land for themselves.

The Killer Elite (1975)

THE KILLER ELITE – REVIEW BY PAULINE KAEL

Peckinpah’s “The Killer Elite” is intensely, claustrophobically exciting, with combat scenes of martial-arts teams photographed in slow motion and then edited in such brief cuts that the fighting is nightmarishly concentrated—almost subliminal.

Pauline Kael

PAULINE KAEL: NUMBING THE AUDIENCE

by Pauline Kael Early this year, the most successful of the large-circulation magazines for teen-age girls took a two-page spread in the Times for an

Little Big Man (1970)

LITTLE BIG MAN: AMERICANA

In Little Big Man, Arthur Penn uses the mode of comic elegy in order to sustain a reverent feeling for the American past without falling into sentimentality

Little Big Man (1970)

LITTLE BIG MAN: THE RED AND THE WHITE

Jack Crabb is 121 years old. His eyes are agate chips; senility seeps through the cracks in his voice. But Crabb is not your average superannuated former Indian fighter. He is Little Big Man, sole survivor of the Battle of Little Bighorn.

ZEITGEIST: MOVING FORWARD [TRANSCRIPT]

A feature length documentary work which presents a case for a needed transition out of the current socioeconomic monetary paradigm which governs the entire world society.

Harry Clarke illustration for Charles Perrault 'Little Red Riding Hood'

CENSORSHIP IN LITERATURE: LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD

Perrault’s Little Red Riding Hood ended with both the little girl and her grandmother dead and no hunter to save them. The Grimm brothers softened the ending to suit their intention of entertainment rather than the moralizing of Perrault’s tales.

Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

CENSORSHIP IN LITERATURE: FAHRENHEIT 451

Fahrenheit 451 is an indictment of censorship and expurgation, so the fact that this book was expurgated and marketed by the publisher that way for 13 years before the author became aware of the abuse is particularly ironic.