SPARTACUS (1960) and THE GUNS OF NAVARONE (1961) – The Guardian Review

2017-08-30T08:36:37-07:00 August 30th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, STANLEY KUBRICK|Tags: , , , |

EPIC FILMS ANCIENT AND MODERN A week of epics. It is true that neither Spartacus (Gaumont) nor The Guns of Navarone (Regal) conform to Bible thumping traditions but as both last for over three hours, including intermissions for the audience to recuperate on orange squash, and are littered with stars, [...]

LE NOTTI DI CABIRIA (1957) – Review by James Kerans [Film Quarterly]

2017-08-23T15:33:29-07:00 August 23rd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, FEDERICO FELLINI|Tags: , , , |

by James Kerans All the Fellini virtues are here: the fluent camera, the wit, the elegant composition, the theme-and-variations style, the melange of theatrical and religious symbol, the parabolic eloquence, the vocabulary of private motifs. La Strada is more exciting, because it calls for the management of material more coarse, [...]

LAST TANGO IN PARIS (1972) – Review by Bosley Crowther

2017-08-23T11:51:59-07:00 August 23rd, 2017|Categories: BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI, CINEMA|Tags: , , |

by Bosley Crowther The vast attention that Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris received while it was several months in the making and when it opened in the fall of 1972 was not due to the prospect of its being a likely worldshaking film. It was because Marlon Brando was [...]

KUBRICK’S STRANGE LOVE – Review by Gerard Fay [The Guardian]

2017-08-21T23:08:49-07:00 August 21st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, STANLEY KUBRICK|Tags: , , |

by Gerard Fay Stanley Kubrick is unusual among American film directors for a complete lack of flamboyance. He dresses without distinction, talks quietly and modestly, eats and drinks frugally, reads and thinks a lot. He is not an Austrian or even an Hungarian but was born in the Bronx, New [...]

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE – Review by Don Daniels [Sight and Sound]

2017-08-21T15:21:59-07:00 August 21st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, STANLEY KUBRICK|Tags: , , , |

by Don Daniels Stanley Kubrick's films seem to provoke the kind of mindless praise and attack that is called 'controversy' these days. In the case of A Clockwork Orange, the responses have ranged from 'brilliant' to 'boring', with special attention to the film's depictions of violence. If the viewer responds [...]

THE WILD BUNCH: MAN AND MYTH – Time Magazine Review

2017-08-19T16:44:36-07:00 August 19th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, SAM PECKINPAH|Tags: , , |

"When the legend becomes fact," says the canny newspaper editor in John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, "print the legend." Sam Peckinpah is a filmmaker dedicated to telling truths and still preserving the legend of the American West. In feature films (Ride the High Country, Major Dundee) and [...]

INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE (1989) – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-08-18T15:32:09-07:00 August 18th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, PAULINE KAEL, STEVEN SPIELBERG|Tags: , , |

by Pauline Kael A friend of mine who’s in his early fifties and is eminent in his field says that when he grows up he wants to be Sean Connery. He doesn’t mean the smooth operator James Bond; he means the bluff, bare-domed Connery of The Man Who Would Be [...]

THE GODFATHER PART III (1990) – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-08-19T10:34:04-07:00 August 18th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA, PAULINE KAEL|Tags: , , |

by Pauline Kael At the end of The Godfather Part II (1974), the story was complete—beautifully complete. Francis Ford Coppola knew it, and for over a decade he resisted Paramount’s pleas for another sequel. But the studio’s blandishments became more honeyed, his piggy bank was smashed, and late in 1988 [...]