Bonnie and Clyde (1967): Gangsters on the Road to Nowhere – Review by Richard Gilman

2018-08-15T13:29:43+00:00August 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Bonnie and Clyde is about violence and crime, and the desire of the ego to define itself, to live in violence and crime if it can't in anything else. To this end it remains properly sympathetic to the characters it has plucked from history, the sympathy being given not to crime but to a process in which crime figures, to the action by which the ego displays itself as the embattled source of everything—crime, love, violence, goodness, error, dream.

The Servant (1963) – Review by Andrew Sarris

2018-08-07T13:59:53+00:00August 7th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Servant is a genuinely shocking experience for audiences with the imagination to understand the dimensions of the shock. In years to come The Servant may be cited as a prophetic work making the decline and fall of our last cherished illusions about ourselves and our alleged civilization.

2001: A Space Odyssey – Review by John Simon [The New Leader]

2018-08-07T13:17:06+00:00August 7th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

2001: A Space Odyssey is fascinating when it concentrates on apes or machines, and dreadful when it deals with the in-betweens: humans. For all its lively visual and mechanical spectacle, this is a kind of space-Spartacus and, more pretentious still, a shaggy God story.

Once upon a Time in the West (1969) – Review by Dave Kehr

2018-08-03T16:01:50+00:00August 3rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

In Leone’s hands, capitalism itself becomes a mythic force, as much a part of the landscape (it’s embodied here by the building of a railroad across the desert) as the horses or mountain ranges. In criticizing the myth — in filling in the economic relationships American westerns have skipped over —Leone expands and enriches it, which is what the best criticism does.

Life of Brian (1979): “Who threw that stone?”

2018-07-30T04:36:23+00:00July 29th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

Once banned in several American states, Ireland and Norway - and subsequently marketed in Sweden with the tagline, "The film so funny it was banned in Norway" - Life Of Brian is Monty Python at their wittiest, ballsiest best. Taking aim at the fake piety of many religious folk, its genius is perhaps best exemplified by this lapidation set-piece, which riffs on the Gospel of John, Chapter 8.

THE KILLING FIELDS (1984): UNREAL – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-23T10:22:48+00:00July 19th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Killing Fields, which is based on Sydney Schanberg’s 1980 Times Magazine article "The Death and Life of Dith Pran,” is by no means a negligible movie. It shows us the Khmer Rouge transforming Cambodia into a nationwide gulag, and the scenes of this genocidal revolution have the breadth and terror of something deeply imagined.

PRIZZI’S HONOR (1985) – by Pauline Kael

2018-07-17T11:02:47+00:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

If John Huston’s name were not on Prizzi’s Honor, I’d have thought a fresh new talent had burst on the scene, and he’d certainly be the hottest new director in Hollywood. The picture has a daring comic tone—it revels voluptuously in the murderous finagling of the members of a Brooklyn Mafia family, and rejoices in their scams.

RAMBO: FIRST BLOOD PART II (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-17T10:23:28+00:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Rambo: First Blood Part II explodes your previous conception of “overwrought”—it’s like a tank sitting on your lap firing at you. Jump-cutting from one would-be high point to another, Rambo is to the action film what Flashdance was to the musical, with one to-be-cherished difference: audiences are laughing at it.

INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-07-09T11:50:11+00:00July 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Pauline Kael The great thing about a tall tale on the screen is that you can be shown the preposterous and the implausible. In Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, the director Steven Spielberg is like a magician whose tricks are so daring they make you laugh. He [...]

BARRY LYNDON – di Enrico Ghezzi [Il Castoro Cinema]

2018-05-10T09:10:27+00:00May 10th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Barry Lyndon non ha bisogno di chiamarsi Settecento. Se il titolo in Bertolucci indica l’intenzione astratta di definire storicamente quello che – dalla schematica situazione iniziale – si è riproposto come un film dai personaggi classici e «umani»; un film in cui della grandezza e casualità della Storia c’è solo la fluvialità del tempo e l’ampiezza della produzione (la storia economica del film), in Kubrick il nome – come si accennava – deve definire lo sparuto soggetto che è protagonista.

THE PLUCK OF ‘BARRY LYNDON’ – Review by Jonathan Rosenbaum

2018-05-09T09:35:18+00:00May 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

So Barry Lyndon is a failure. So what? How many “successes” have you seen lately that are half as interesting or accomplished, that are worth even ten minutes of thought after leaving them? By my own rough count, a smug little piece of engineering like A Clockwork Orange was worth about five. I’m reminded of what Jonas Mekas wrote about Zazie several years ago: “The fact that the film is a failure means nothing. Didn’t God create a failure, too?”

PROVIDENCE: RESNAIS’ PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS AN OLD MAN

2018-04-30T15:20:10+00:00April 30th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

French director Alain Resnais’ remarkable film, Providence (1977), based upon a screenplay by British dramatist David Mercer, is a powerful but subtle exploration of the creative process. In its concern with the intertwining of past and present and their meeting ground in memory, Providence confirms that Resnais is the filmmaker whose work most closely corresponds to that of literary modernists such as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Dorothy Richardson.

THE ADVENTURES OF BARON MUNCHAUSEN (1988): TOO HIP BY HALF – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-04-23T17:15:13+00:00April 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

What saves Munchausen from mediocrity is that you sense that Gilliam is brainstorming. He goes hippety-hoppety all over the place. The picture is too dry and too busy to be considered merely mediocre. And he has his gifts. He retains an edge of Monty Python’s cranky, warped slapstick, and he has a painter’s eye.

CIMINO, KUBRICK E IL GIOCO DELL’IDENTITÀ E DELLA DIFFERENZA – di Guido Barlozzetti

2018-04-22T13:30:42+00:00April 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Da Nang è lontana da Montelepre. La storia di Salvatore Giuliano e la guerra del Vietnam non si consumano sotto lo stesso cielo. Ma, forse, le traiettorie della "blindatissima" Full Metal Jacket e la parabola fatale del Siciliano attraversano lo "stesso" cinema.

MAKING ALIEN: BEHIND THE SCENES [Cinefantastique Special]

2018-03-24T20:12:32+00:00March 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , , , |

Talking with the creators of Alien (1979). Interviews with Ridley Scott (Director), Walter Hill (Producer), David Giler (Producer), Carlo Rambaldi (Creator of Alien Head Effects), Bolaji Badejo ("The Alien"), Michael Seymour (Production Designer), Ivor Powell (Associate Producer), Roger Dicken (Creator of Small Alien Forms), H.R. Giger (Alien Designer)

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY – Review by John Hofsess

2018-03-08T18:45:20+00:00March 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

2001 no less than Dr. Strangelove is an apocalyptic vision: it i is an alternate future but no less pessimistic. Beneath its austerely beautiful surface an alarm is sounded for us to examine a problem of which Dr. Strangelove was a pronounced symptom: the possibility that man is as much at the mercy of his own artifacts as ever he was of the forces of nature.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY – Reviews by Louise Sweeney and John Allen [The Christian Science Monitor]

2018-03-08T16:13:04+00:00March 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Louise Sweeney, New York-based film critic for The Christian Science Monitor, wrote a generally favorable review following the New York premiere of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Boston staff critic John Allen’s full-page review appeared in the Monitor a month later and M-G-M reprinted it as an ad in a Sunday edition of The New York Times.

POPEYE (1980) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-03-07T08:52:35+00:00March 7th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Sometimes the components of a picture seem miraculously right and you go to it expecting a magical interaction. That's the case with Popeye. But it comes off a little like some of the Jacques Tati comedies, where you can see the intelligence and skill that went into the gags yet you don't hear yourself laughing.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY – The Harvard Crimson Review

2018-03-06T08:50:12+00:00March 6th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , |

After we have seen a stewardess walk up a wall and across the ceiling early in the film, we no longer question similar amazements and accept Kubrick's new world without question. The credibility of the special effects established, we can suspend disbelief, to use a justifiable cliche, and revel in the beauty and imagination of Kubrick/Clarke's space.

SILENCE OF THE LAMBS (1991) – “A Census Taker Once Tried To Test Me…”

2018-03-05T23:24:50+00:00March 5th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

As part of a police effort to suss out the workings of serial killer Buffalo Bills mind, rookie FBI Agent Clarice Starling (Foster) is assigned the task of interrogating Hannibal “The Cannibal” Lecter (Hopkins). Having extracted the information that she suffered verbal abuse from fellow prisoner Miggs (Stuart Levine) on the way in (“I can smell your cunt,” he hisses charmingly), the good Doctor turns the conversation towards fragrances of a less personal nature...

‘THE GODFATHER’ AND THE DECLINE OF MARLON BRANDO – Review by Stanley Kauffmann

2018-03-02T22:07:19+00:00March 2nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Hurricane Marlon is sweeping the country, and I wish it were more than hot air. A tornado of praise—cover stories and huzzahs—blasts out the news that Brando is giving a marvelous performance as Don Corleone in The Godfather, the lapsed Great Actor has regained himself, and so on. As a Brando-watcher for almost 30 years, I’d like to agree.

BAND OF OUTSIDERS: GODARD AMONG THE GANGSTERS – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-27T23:24:31+00:00February 27th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Jean-Luc Godard intended to give the public what it wanted. His next film was going to be about a girl and a gun—”A sure-fire story which will sell a lot of tickets.” And so, like Henry James’ hero in The Next Time he proceeded to make a work of art that sold fewer tickets than ever. What was to be a simple commercial movie about a robbery became Band of Outsiders.

POLTERGEIST (1982): HOOPER’S VISION & SPIELBERG’S CHARM CREATE A GREAT GHOST STORY – Review by Kyle Counts

2018-02-25T11:45:23+00:00February 25th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Spiel­berg, as co-author/producer (and some say director), has tempered Hooper’s harsh, visceral style with folksy humor and near-bloodless titillation, while Hooper has underscored Spielberg's conservative, child-at-play consciousness with dark touches of Grand Guignol.

THE DEER HUNTER: “GOD BLESS AMERICA” – Review by Chris Auty [Time Out]

2018-02-24T19:28:02+00:00February 24th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Deer Hunter is a brilliant epic about the simple things of life. To its director Michael Cimino they are 'friendship, courage, dignity, grace' and through them the movie's Vietnam veterans turn into Homeric heroes. Chris Auty pays his respects, but wonders if this catalogue of rituals hasn't tried to make time stand still.

“THE DEER HUNTER” AND THE DEMYTHIFICATION OF THE AMERICAN HERO – by Nick Pease

2018-02-24T12:59:28+00:00February 24th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Something ominous has been going on since The Deer Hunter first made its appearance, and especially since it won an Academy Award: Certain activist groups, in an unfortunate misunderstanding of the film, have protested it as a kind of racist document that, as a New York Post article summarized it, “ . . . contrasts the innocence of American GIs . . . with the savage Vietnamese enemy they meet on the battlefield.”

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY – THE PROLOGUE INTERVIEWS

2018-02-23T16:53:37+00:00February 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , |

Kubrick’s original plan was to open 2001 with a ten-minute prologue (35mm film, black and white) — edited interviews on extraterrestrial possibilities with experts on space, theology, chemistry, biology, astronomy. Kubrick says that he decided after the first screening of 2001 for M-G-M executives, in Culver City, Cali­fornia, that it wasn’t a good idea to open 2001 with a prologue, and it was eliminated immediately.

WRITING THE WEST: ICONIC AND LITERAL TRUTH IN “UNFORGIVEN”

2018-02-23T13:53:05+00:00February 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

The popular and critical success of Clint Eastwood’s Unforgiven (1992) has prompted a number of discussions about the status of the Western, Eastwood’s cinematic persona, and the currency of each in a changing cultural landscape. An accepted critical reading of the film that has already emerged suggests that it revises the Western genre.

CRIES AND WHISPERS: BERGMAN’S WOMEN – Review by Paul D. Zimmerman

2018-02-23T08:20:53+00:00February 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Ingmar Bergman—the Swedish creator of The Seventh Seal—long ago abandoned his interest in the mysterious ties between God and man in favor of a broader humanism. His latest film, Cries and Whispers, confronts the realities of the human condition—man’s destiny on "the dark, dirty earth under an empty, cruel Heaven.” Now Bergman seeks his answers in the workings of the human heart alone.

FRENZY: THE HITCHCOCK PROBLEM – Review by William S. Pechter

2018-02-22T09:13:24+00:00February 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

With Frenzy, its director, Alfred Hitchcock, is said to have returned to form, but to what form has he returned? To a resounding orchestral accompaniment, so different from the anxiety-producing music with which Bernard Herrmann contributed so much to Vertigo and Psycho, we move from a panoramic view of the city of London to a Thames-side gathering at which a politician's speech about progress against the river’s pollution is interrupted by the discovery of a floating corpse.

CRIES AND WHISPERS: BERGMAN’S STUDY IN SCARLET – Review by Hollis Alpert

2018-02-22T00:03:54+00:00February 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

In Ingmar Bergman’s latest film, Cries and Whispers, the predominant tones are red, and from the very beginning of its production he did not hesitate to explain why this is so. He had a dream, he said, and in the dream he saw a group of women dressed in white, whispering together in a room bathed completely in red.

BEYOND THE STARS – by Jeremy Bernstein

2018-02-21T16:25:52+00:00February 21st, 2018|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , , |

We are happy to report, for the benefit of science-fiction buffs—who have long felt that, at its best, science fiction is a splendid medium for conveying the poetry and wonder of science—that there will soon be a movie for them. We have this from none other than the two authors of the movie, which is to be called Journey Beyond the Stars—Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke.

THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE (1972) – Review by Robert Hatch [The Nation]

2018-02-20T18:37:02+00:00February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

By setting his film in the surreal world of dreaming, Buñuel casts himself as a jester rather than as an Old Testament prophet, crying "Woe, woe." Awake, this assemblage might have been too much for the old man’s equanimity; while they sleep, it is enough that he skip about them, poking them keenly with his rattle.

THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE: ANARCHIST’S LAUGHTER – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-23T13:44:13+00:00February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a cosmic vaudeville show —an Old Master’s mischief. Now seventy-two, Luis Bunuel is no longer savage about the hypocrisy and the inanity of the privileged classes. They don’t change, and since they have become a persistent bad joke to him, he has grown almost fond of their follies—the way one can grow fond of the snarls and the silliness of vicious pets.

DELIVERANCE (1972) – Review by Richard Schickel

2018-02-20T16:12:34+00:00February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

I suspect that James Dickey, who adapted his best-selling novel Deliverance for the screen, and John Boorman, who directed it, are trying to tell us something fairly important by subjecting four sober, settled, middle-class gentlemen in their thirties to a series of wilderness trials that test their courage and cunning in a manner we usually associate with the initiation of adolescents into primitive tribes.

FROM DOMESTIC NIGHTMARES TO THE NIGHTMARE OF HISTORY. UNCANNY ERUPTIONS OF VIOLENCE IN KING’S AND KUBRICK’S VERSIONS OF ‘THE SHINING’

2018-05-22T22:51:38+00:00February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

The impact of past violence on the present is examined in the novel and film versions of The Shining. John Lutz’s essay pinpoints in these works three interrelated elements of what Freud called the “uncanny”—the domestic abuse story, “the postcolonial narrative of American expansion at the expense of nonwhite victims, and the desire for power and control that underlies commodification and the social hierarchies that reinforce it.”

ADAPTATION OF AN AUTEUR: TRUFFAUT’S JULES ET JIM (1961) FROM THE NOVEL BY HENRI-PIERRE ROCHÉ – by Stuart Y. McDougal

2018-02-19T17:40:42+00:00February 19th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

In 1956, François Truffaut was browsing in a Paris bookstore when his eyes fell on a copy of Jules et Jim by Henri-Pierre Roché. He was immediately drawn to the title and, as he studied the jacket, intrigued to discover that it was a septuagenarian's first novel. At the time Truffaut was twenty-four and supporting him­self by writing film criticism for Cahiers du Cinéma and Arts. He purchased the novel, took it home, and pored over it until, like a character in Fahrenheit 451, he knew it by heart.

PALE RIDER (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-18T11:19:33+00:00February 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

As an actor, Eastwood never lets down his guard. His idea of being a real man is that it’s something you have to pretend to be—as Sergio Leone put it, he’s wearing a suit of armor. This actor has made a career out of his terror of expressiveness. Now here he is playing a stiff, a ghost. It’s perfect casting, but he doesn’t have the daring to let go and have fun with it. Even as a ghost, he’s armored.

BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-18T11:21:27+00:00February 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

What keeps Back to the Future from being a comedy classic is that its eye is on the market. Despite Zemeckis and Gale’s wit in devising intricate structures that keep blowing fuses, the thinking here is cramped and conventional. I wish that moviemakers and their designers would stop using old Life magazines for their images of the American past.

SHEPHERDING THE WEAK: THE ETHICS OF REDEMPTION IN QUENTIN TARANTINO’S ‘PULP FICTION’

2018-02-21T10:17:23+00:00February 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

Although a number of critics in the popular press laud Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction for its non-linear narrative, quirky performances, and oddly resonant dialogue regarding such issues as hamburgers, television pilot episodes, and foot massages, critics in other circles deride Tarantino’s creation for its extreme violence and lack of moral clarity.

IMAGISM AND MARTIN SCORSESE: IMAGES SUSPENDED AND EXTENDED – by George P. Castellitto

2018-02-15T19:01:33+00:00February 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

Scorsese's technique of "freezing” objects generates a particular method of cinematic exposition in which characters and objects are portrayed in a moment between movement and non-movement; this “moment” is the bridge between potential behavior and stasis. The "thing” is frozen or suspended on the screen, and the possibility of either stasis or experience emerges from this momentary suspension.

VICTIM (1961) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-11T23:35:52+00:00February 11th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

It was a bit startling to pick up an English newspaper and see that the review of Victim was entitled “Ten-letter word”—but as it turned out. The Observer was referring not to Lenny Bruce’s much publicized hyphenated word but to the simple term “homosexual,” which it appears is startling enough in a movie to make the Johnson office refuse to give Victim a seal of approval.

STANLEY KUBRICK: LA SOGGETTIVA DEL CADAVERE – di Vito Zagarrio

2018-02-09T17:27:46+00:00February 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

La Storia, diceva ancora Baudrillard, è uno scenario rétro, è un “cadavere” che si può mettere in scena, un "fossile” che può essere rappresentato e “simulato”. «La Storia fa così il suo ingresso trionfale nel cinema a titolo postumo». Baudrillard no­tava come questa riapparizione della Storia non avesse un valore di presa di coscienza, ma di nostalgia di un referente perduto.

SCARECROW AND KINDERGARTEN: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS AND COMPARISON – by Alexander Gershkovich

2018-02-08T23:18:32+00:00February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

The more an artist is worried by the problem of how his picture will be perceived by the public, what the critics will say, how the "authorities" will look on it, the greater the danger that the artist will deviate from the truth, and from his original conception, and the further he will be from the search for truth in art and from the sensitive questions of his time. And, as a result, the less will be the social impact of his film.

KUBRICK, FREUD E LA COAZIONE A RIPETERE – di Sandro Bernardi

2018-02-08T16:06:39+00:00February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Che Kubrick conoscesse Freud è fuor di dubbio; lo si ricava da tutta la sua opera, ma basterebbe anche solo quell’accenno al Perturbante che il regista lascia cadere nell’intervista con Michel Ciment, a proposito del film The Shining: «Nel suo scritto sul perturbante Freud affermò che il per­turbante costituisce l’unica sensazione che si provi con maggior forza sia nell’arte che nella vita»

ACCATTONE: POET AND THE PIMP – Review by Stanley Kauffmann

2018-02-08T13:05:59+00:00February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Accattone lives as a work of narrow but intense vision—a film about viciousness and criminality that evokes compassion. Its style is neorealist: it was made on locations, not in studios, with nonprofessional performers. Sometimes this method makes merely vernacular films, but it gives Accattone a grainy, gripping authenticity.

EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK – by Penelope Gilliatt

2018-02-07T09:11:17+00:00February 6th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

The above headline is taken from Dr. David Reuben’s book Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex but Were Afraid To Ask, a waggish tome now turned into a cockeyed and sometimes insanely funny film of the same name, written and directed by Woody Allen.

SALO, OR THE 120 DAYS OF SODOM: PASOLINI’S SADISTIC WORK OF ART – by Donald Farmer

2018-02-05T23:46:05+00:00February 5th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , |

The circumstances accompanying the 1977 American release of Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom were almost as unusual as those depicted in this, the final film of Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini. Advance word in Film Comment, Film Quarterly and particu­larly The Village Voice indicated that Salo features extremes of sadism, violence and scatology then un­heard of in a major picture, and the publicity mills were scarcely hampered by the fact that Pasolini himself had been brutally murdered on November 2, 1975 - nearly six months after his film’s completion.

WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE (2014): HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS – By Nick Bradshaw

2018-02-04T01:17:51+00:00February 4th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Hiromasa Yonebayashi’s When Marnie Was There transposes a classic of English children’s literature to modern-day Japan to tell the tale of an orphan discovering the dark secrets of her past, in what might well be the last in-house feature from the great animation house Studio Ghibli

WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE (2014) – Review by Kate Stables

2018-02-04T01:05:24+00:00February 4th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Despite the absence of the kind of imaginative spectacle or battle sequences that galvanised Spirited Away (2001) and Princess Mononoke (1997), When Marnie Was There is expertly atmospheric. Its action is all contained within its emotional ebb and flow, as fierce as the tides that lap at Marsh House.

THE GODFATHER: THE RESURRECTION OF DON BRANDO – Review by Richard Schickel

2018-02-03T19:23:51+00:00February 3rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

There’s nothing fun or funny to be found here. It offers us only the absorption of good acting and good storytelling combined with a plausible anthropology of a strange, terribly relevant culture. What more could we possibly want from a movie? How often, these days, do we get anything like all that?

THE GODFATHER: HOW BRANDO BROUGHT DON CORLEONE TO LIFE – by Joseph Gelmis [Newsday]

2018-02-03T18:49:35+00:00February 3rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

And then there was Marion Brando, against all the odds, cast in one of filmdom’s juiciest roles, as mob chief Don Vito Corleone. He was eased in, despite stiff opposition from the studio brass, because of the advocacy of a thirtyish fan, Francis Ford Coppola, an Italian-American who happened to be the director of The Godfather. Once he got the part, Brando in turn helped Coppola maintain camaraderie during the frenzied three-month shooting by kibitzing with the cast and establishing a fatherly relationship.

THE GODFATHER PLAYS ON OUR SECRET ADMIRATION FOR MEN WHO GET WHAT THEY WANT – by Arthur Schlesinger Jr. [Vogue]

2018-02-02T17:37:51+00:00February 2nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Inflation does not always assure survival. My guess is that three years from now we will still remember scenes from Raoul Walsh’s The Roaring Twenties (1939) while The Godfather will have become a vague memory.

RIDLEY SCOTT’S BLADE RUNNER: THE MAKING OF A SCI-FI CLASSIC

2018-02-02T10:39:07+00:00February 2nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , , , , |

Interviews with screenwriters Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, industrial designer Syd Mead, production designer Lawrence C. Paull and director Ridley Scott. Articles & Interviews by Randy & Jean-Marc Lofficier for Starlog magazine, November 1992 issue.

BALLA COI LUPI: INTERVISTA A KEVIN COSTNER – di Elisa Leonelli [Ciak]

2018-01-31T08:27:37+00:00January 31st, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Kevin Costner ha deciso di debuttare nella regia scegliendo un genere sempre meno frequentato come il western e con un film, accolto molto positivamente tanto dalla critica che dal pubblico, che è un vero e proprio atto d'amore nei confronti della cultura indiana.

GUILTY PLEASURES: THE FILMS OF PAUL SCHRADER – by Neil Sinyard [Cinema Papers]

2018-01-28T18:56:07+00:00January 28th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Paul Schrader is one of the seminal figures of the contemporary American cinema. His success is attributable to the creative use of his critical faculty and a commercial deployment of his Calvinism. The result is a body of work that is a bracing commentary on classic and modern Hollywood, and whose bleak vision would make film noir look like musical comedy.

THE LIFE OF BRIAN (1979) – Review by Dennis Altman [Cinema Papers]

2018-01-28T16:46:52+00:00January 28th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

Blasphemy is by no means dead in Britain, as the recent condemnation of Gay News, for publishing a poem portraying Christ as homosexual, reveals. But The Life of Brian has nothing about it as shocking to the faithful as this, and is saved indeed from blasphemy by its sheer vulgarity.

ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ (1979) Review by Jack Clancy [Cinema Papers]

2018-01-28T13:13:49+00:00January 28th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Escape from Alcatraz opens with the camera panning across San Francisco Bay and the bridge, and then to the grim, gloomy island of Alcatraz. The first sequence, as the credits come up, shows the arrival, through rain and darkness, of a prisoner for the "Rock": it is shot in tight, constricted close- up and mostly in shadow.

DISNEY AND FREUD: WALT MEETS THE ID – by David I. Berland M.D.

2018-01-27T19:41:58+00:00January 27th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Studying Freud and other early psychoanalysts can lead to a better understanding of children and consequently to appreciating the effects of some of Disney’s works. Freud’s concept of the mind’s structure can be useful in explaining the appeal of Disney’s characters because many of them (Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, Goofy and others) embody universal aspects of the personality: id, ego and superego.

POLICE OSCAR: “THE FRENCH CONNECTION”: AND AN INTERVIEW WITH WILLIAM FRIEDKIN – by Michael Shedlin

2018-01-26T09:18:20+00:00January 26th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Since propaganda, whether blatant or subtle, and whether “left” or “right,” works primarily through the emotions and not the intellect, it is not necessarily the explicit or easily recogniz­able elements of a film that produce the strong­est effect on the consciousness of the viewer. Such is the case with a film like The French Connection. The explicit values are evident. The film is exquisitely made.

IL DOTTOR STRANAMORE – di Enrico Ghezzi [Il Castoro Cinema]

2018-01-25T09:46:59+00:00January 25th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Per molti versi, il film più «erotico» di Kubrick è 'Il dr. Stranamore' (1963) (girato anch’esso in Inghilterra), che segna la fine della collaborazione con Harris (il quale vuol passare alla regia ed esordirà due anni dopo con 'Stato d'allarme', film che sembra essere la risposta «realistica» a Stranamore).

THE SACRED AND THE PROFANE: EXAMINING THE RELIGIOUS SUBTEXT OF RIDLEY SCOTT’S ‘BLADE RUNNER’

2018-02-21T09:54:31+00:00January 24th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Ridley Scott's film "Blade Runner" is rooted in the myths and legends of Western culture and draws on a number of genres including film noir and science fiction. Central to the plot, though, is the Genesis story of the creation and fall. Gravett examines the religious subtext of the film, and discusses Deckard and Roy Batty's relationship in terms of the biblical story of Jacob and Esau.

BARRY LYNDON: SETTECENTO – Recensione di Enzo Ungari

2018-01-23T12:32:08+00:00January 23rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Lontano dal cinema di formule e procedimenti a cui rimanda soltanto per la sua mole produttiva, Barry Lyndon si situa in quella zona dove il cinema è invenzione, ricerca, esperimento. Ma dove tutti, coraggiosamente e confusamente, cercano, Stanley Kubrick trova. Non domanda, risponde.

PROGRESS REPORT: ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN (1976) – by Harry Clein [American Film]

2018-01-22T16:13:17+00:00January 22nd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

On two soundstages at the Burbank Studios, 30.000 square feet are given over to a replica of the fifth door newsroom of The Washington Post. Alan Pakula, the director of the film version of 'All the President's Men', had wanted to use the actual newsroom, but the Post’s editors fretted that this would interfere with the paper’s day-to-day operations.

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND: THE GREENING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-21T11:50:05+00:00January 21st, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Close Encounters of the Third Kind is the most innocent of all technological-marvel movies, and one of the most satisfying. This film has retained some of the wonder and bafflement we feel when we first go into a plan­etarium: we ooh and aah at the vastness, and at the beauty of the mystery. The film doesn’t overawe us, though, because it has a child’s playfulness and love of surprises.

BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI’S 1900: HAIL, FOLLY! – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-20T12:31:28+00:00January 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Bertolucci is trying to transcend the audience appeal of his lyrical, psy­chological films. He is trying to make a people’s film by drawing on the mythology of movies, as if it were a collective memory. 1900 is a romantic moviegoer's vision of the class struggle—a love poem for the movies as well as for the life of those who live communally on the land.

THE AMERICAN FRIEND – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-20T08:45:45+00:00January 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Angst-dark primary colors—reds and blues so intense they’re near­psychedelic, yet grimy, rotting in the thick, muggy atmosphere. Cities that blur into each other. Characters as figures in cityscapes or as exiles in rooms that are insistently not home. And, under it all, morbid, premon­itory music.

C’ERA UNA VOLTA IN AMERICA – Recensione di Stefano Consiglio [Filmcritica]

2018-01-15T16:18:04+00:00January 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

«Credevo fosse un’avventura. E invece era la vita... » (J. Conrad) ... Riprendendo questa frase nel corso di un’intervista, Sergio Leo­ne si riferiva al tempo trascorso da quando ebbe l’idea di trarre un film dal libro di Harry Grey A mano armata a quando, finalmente il film è riuscito a farlo

QUEST FOR FIRE (1981) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-12T15:41:04+00:00January 12th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Eighty thousand years ago, on broad primeval plains, Naoh (Everett McGill), the bravest warrior of the spear-carrying Ulam tribe, and two fellow-warriors, Amoukar (Ron Perlman) and Gaw (Nameer El-Kadi), are sent out on the sacred mission of finding fire and bringing it back to the Ulam.

JEAN-JACQUES ANNAUD: PREHISTORIC HEAT AN INTERVIEW WITH THE CREATOR OF ‘QUEST FOR FIRE’

2018-01-11T09:54:03+00:00January 11th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , |

While audiences have long exhibited a penchant for movies about the future, few people expected today's science-fiction generation to go wild over a film set 80,000 years in the past. Yet that's what has happened with Quest for Fire, an ambitious work that portrays primitive man's attempts to understand and harness the elements around him.

QUEST FOR FIRE (1981): ACTION/ADVENTURE AT THE DAWN OF CIVILIZATION – by Ed Naha [Starlog]

2018-01-11T10:01:22+00:00January 11th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

The domestication of fire was the key development that separated hominids from the rest of the animal kingdom, enabled them to live in hostile environments and spurred the development of language and agriculture. Through this brilliant exercise in backward extrapolation, we get a glimpse of what it might have been like, 80,00 years ago.

WRITING ‘THE SHINING’ – by Diane Johnson

2018-02-02T08:46:56+00:00January 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

We each began by deconstructing King’s novel separately, reducing it to essential scenes, comparing our lists of scenes, and winnowing them down to a hundred or so. I tore bits of exposition and dialogue out of a paper­back copy of the novel and put them in little envelopes on which were written “# 1 The Arrival,” and so on.

BARRY LYNDON: NARRATIVE AND DISCOURSE IN KUBRICK’S MODERN TRAGEDY – Essay by Michael Klein

2018-02-15T20:56:33+00:00December 17th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Michael Klein Even inept films sometimes carry with them a certain mesmerizing authority. Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon, a flawed work based upon a rather uninspiring novel, can be enjoyed, for instance, for its visual effects: sheer photography. And the background music is superb.1 The music offputtingly classical under the [...]

BLACK BOOK (2006): INTERVIEW WITH PAUL VERHOEVEN

2017-12-29T12:17:24+00:00December 12th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , |

Paul Verhoeven has returned home to Holland for his latest film, Black Book, the harrowing story of a young Jewish woman who finds herself thrown by circumstance into the resistance against the Nazis, where she is asked to pose as a sexy cabaret singer in order to get close to Holland’s head of the SS

THE GODFATHER PART II: FATHERS AND SONS – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-12-12T09:42:17+00:00December 12th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Throughout the three hours and twenty minutes of Part II, there are so many moments of epiphany — mysterious, reverberant images, such as the small Vito singing in his cell — that one scarcely has the emotional resources to deal with the experience of this film.

THE SHINING: A NEW DEFINITION FOR “ULTIMATE HORROR” – by Jim Wynorski [Fangoria]

2017-12-12T12:24:34+00:00December 9th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Both Kubrick and King merit congratulations for making The Shining one of the most overpowering experiences of horror ever committed to celluloid. It manages to treat intangible, elusive subjects—ghosts, demons, spirits and the like—as if they were as real as this morning's headlines.

THIRD DIVE INTO THE OCEAN: ANDREI TARKOVSKY’S ‘THE STALKER’ – Positif review

2017-12-08T11:04:12+00:00December 8th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The thaw in the Soviet Union made it possible for new filmmakers, although not without difficulty, to assert their personal vision. The most striking of these was indisputably Andrei Tarkovsky, Emmanuel Carrère discusses the grandeur of Stalker.

ENTREVISTA FEDERICO FELLINI – GEORGES SIMENON (1977)

2017-12-02T20:34:44+00:00December 2nd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , |

Cannes, 1960. El jurado del Festival, influido por Georges Simenon, otorga la Palma de Oro a La Dolce Vita, de Fellini. Es el comienzo de una amistad por correspondencia que llegará a su momento culminante en 1977, cuando escritor y cineasta por fin se encuentran en persona y mantienen la siguiente entrevista después del estreno de Casanova.

FEDERICO FELLINI: INTERVISTA A PLAYBOY (1966)

2017-12-02T18:47:38+00:00December 2nd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , |

Nel febbraio 1966, il regista già autore de La Strada, La Dolce Vita e 8½, dopo aver finito di girare Giulietta degli Spiriti - e dopo un paio di settimane per far “raffreddare il cervello" - incontra due inviati di Playboy, tra la spiaggia di Fregene e Roma, per parlare di cinema. E della sua visione personale su sesso e amore

MORGAN FREEMAN: INTERVIEW AT THE BFI (2000)

2017-12-10T12:10:37+00:00December 1st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , |

On Friday July 14 2000, Morgan Freeman was interviewed by Richard Jobson in front of a packed audience in London's National Film Theatre. The event followed a screening of his latest movie, the taut psychological thriller Under Suspicion, in which he stars with Gene Hackman

SOMETHING TO DO WITH DEATH: A FISTFUL OF SERGIO LEONE – by Richard T. Jameson

2018-01-26T22:24:02+00:00November 30th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Richard T. Jameson Early in 1967. United Artists undertook a massive publicity campaign to sell the country on a recent acquisition that had broken box-office records in its native Italy and might, just might do the same in the States. After all, its inspiration was American—what more American than [...]

DANCES WITH WOLVES (1990) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-01-30T23:23:17+00:00November 28th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The movie—Costner’s debut as a director—is childishly naïve. When Lieutenant Dunbar is alone with his pet wolf, he’s like Robinson Crusoe on Mars. When he tries to get to know the Sioux, and he and they are feeling each other out, it’s like a sci-fi film that has the hero trying to communicate with an alien race.

DR. STRANGELOVE: OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB – Review by Penelope Gilliatt

2017-11-16T15:25:17+00:00November 16th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

The key of the brilliant comic tone of the film is in the title. What makes the picture so funny, terrifying and horribly believable is that everyone in the film really has learned to stop worrying, as smokers do about lung cancer after living with the statistics for a bit.

IMPORTANCE AND ULTIMATE FAILURE OF LAST TANGO IN PARIS

2017-11-12T18:38:19+00:00November 12th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

Last Tango in Paris is an important film because of the way it deals with film history. By showing the inadequacy of and parodying two recent influential film styles, 1950s Hollywood and French New Wave, Bertolucci critiques and condemns the outmoded ideas and attitudes which informed these styles.

VITTORIO STORARO: MAESTRO OF LIGHT

2017-11-12T08:12:46+00:00November 11th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: |

“To me, making a film is like resolving conflicts between light and dark, cold and warmth, blue and orange or other contrasting colors. There should be a sense of energy, or change of movement. A sense that time is going on — light becomes night, which reverts to morning. Life becomes death."

INTERVIEW WITH MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI (1969) – by Charles Thomas Samuels

2017-11-23T11:46:57+00:00October 11th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: |

by Charles Thomas Samuels Rome, July 29, 1969 The living room of Antonioni's apartment, where this interview took place, reflects intellectual restlessness rather than a desire for comfort. Except for a plush couch, the room is sparely furnished, yet everywhere there are books, records, a wild array of bric-a-brac. One [...]

STANLEY KUBRICK’S THE SHINING – Review by Flo Leibowitz and Lynn Jeffress [Film Quarterly]

2017-09-16T13:13:43+00:00September 16th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Flo Leibowitz and Lynn Jeffress To all appearances, The Shining is simply a hope­lessly clichéd gothic horror film. Can this be ser­ious? A lonely house on a hill haunted by ancestral ghosts that curse successive generations and force them to re-enact the original horror. It is not even redeemed [...]

‘SPARTACUS’: HAILED IN FAREWELL (1960) – by Eugene Archer

2017-12-18T16:31:27+00:00August 30th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , , |

by Eugene Archer Critics have always debated the correct way to apportion the credit for a multi-million-dollar production among producers, writers, actors and corps of technicians, but Stanley Kubrick, the youthful director of Spartacus, has no such doubts. If any critical bouquets are available after the elaborate costume spectacle opens [...]

SPARTACUS (1960) and THE GUNS OF NAVARONE (1961) – The Guardian Review

2017-08-30T08:36:37+00:00August 30th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

EPIC FILMS ANCIENT AND MODERN A week of epics. It is true that neither Spartacus (Gaumont) nor The Guns of Navarone (Regal) conform to Bible thumping traditions but as both last for over three hours, including intermissions for the audience to recuperate on orange squash, and are littered with stars, [...]

STANLEY KUBRICK: AT A DISTANCE – Interview by Lloyd Rose

2017-10-07T08:43:56+00:00August 28th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , |

by Lloyd Rose PINEWOOD GREEN, ENGLAND – The board room at Pinewood Studios is disturbingly baroque. The ceiling sags with chandeliers. Gilt-edged paneling dresses every inch of wall. At one end a cold-eyed movie mogul, the late J. Arthur Rank, grins from his painted portrait. It hangs above a sideboard [...]

LE NOTTI DI CABIRIA (1957) – Review by James Kerans [Film Quarterly]

2017-08-23T15:33:29+00:00August 23rd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by James Kerans All the Fellini virtues are here: the fluent camera, the wit, the elegant composition, the theme-and-variations style, the melange of theatrical and religious symbol, the parabolic eloquence, the vocabulary of private motifs. La Strada is more exciting, because it calls for the management of material more coarse, [...]

LAST TANGO IN PARIS (1972) – Review by Bosley Crowther

2017-08-23T11:51:59+00:00August 23rd, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Bosley Crowther The vast attention that Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris received while it was several months in the making and when it opened in the fall of 1972 was not due to the prospect of its being a likely worldshaking film. It was because Marlon Brando was [...]

KUBRICK’S STRANGE LOVE – Review by Gerard Fay [The Guardian]

2017-08-21T23:08:49+00:00August 21st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Gerard Fay Stanley Kubrick is unusual among American film directors for a complete lack of flamboyance. He dresses without distinction, talks quietly and modestly, eats and drinks frugally, reads and thinks a lot. He is not an Austrian or even an Hungarian but was born in the Bronx, New [...]

NEO-NEO-REALISM: BANDITS AT ORGOSOLO

2017-08-21T20:03:35+00:00August 21st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|

by Jean-Andre Fieschi Original article: ‘Néo-néo-réalisme’, Cahiers du Cinéma 141, March 1963 No one could be more pleased than we are that American cinema has on the whole won the war that history said it had to win (and not just by winning over the critics). We don't deny that [...]

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE – Review by Don Daniels [Sight and Sound]

2017-08-21T15:21:59+00:00August 21st, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Don Daniels Stanley Kubrick's films seem to provoke the kind of mindless praise and attack that is called 'controversy' these days. In the case of A Clockwork Orange, the responses have ranged from 'brilliant' to 'boring', with special attention to the film's depictions of violence. If the viewer responds [...]

THE WILD BUNCH: MAN AND MYTH – Time Magazine Review

2017-08-19T16:44:36+00:00August 19th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

"When the legend becomes fact," says the canny newspaper editor in John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, "print the legend." Sam Peckinpah is a filmmaker dedicated to telling truths and still preserving the legend of the American West. In feature films (Ride the High Country, Major Dundee) and [...]

INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE (1989) – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-08-18T15:32:09+00:00August 18th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Pauline Kael A friend of mine who’s in his early fifties and is eminent in his field says that when he grows up he wants to be Sean Connery. He doesn’t mean the smooth operator James Bond; he means the bluff, bare-domed Connery of The Man Who Would Be [...]

THE GODFATHER PART III (1990) – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-08-19T10:34:04+00:00August 18th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Pauline Kael At the end of The Godfather Part II (1974), the story was complete—beautifully complete. Francis Ford Coppola knew it, and for over a decade he resisted Paramount’s pleas for another sequel. But the studio’s blandishments became more honeyed, his piggy bank was smashed, and late in 1988 [...]

BLADE RUNNER – Review by Michael Dempsey [Film Quarterly]

2018-02-02T01:47:49+00:00August 14th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Michael Dempsey In director Ridley Scott’s $30-million noir thriller, Blade Runner, set in Los Angeles 36 years from now, sophisticated new robots known as “replicants” have drastically narrowed the gap between humans and machines. Prize creations of the cadaverous, ironic Dr. Eldon Tyrell and his superconglomerate, they not only [...]

BARRY LYNDON: KUBRICK’S GRANDEST GAMBLE – by Richard Schickel

2017-08-12T11:28:54+00:00August 11th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

by Richard Schickel FIRST PARADOX: Barry Lyndon, a story of an 18th century Irish gentleman-rogue, is the first novel of a great 19th century writer, William Makepeace Thackeray. It shows early signs of a genius that would nourish only after creative struggle and personal adversity. In time, this forgotten book [...]

THE GARDEN OF THE FINZI-CONTINIS – Review by Richard Schickel

2017-08-11T10:21:41+00:00August 11th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

A tragedy of false security by Richard Schickel The film looks as if it had been photographed through the mists of time. Often its characters seem to move with the strange deliberation of figures in a dreamed memory, their outlines softened by the years. Yet its images, its language (and [...]