ADAPTATION OF AN AUTEUR: Truffaut’s Jules et Jim (1961) from the novel by Henri-Pierre Roche

2018-02-19T14:11:15-08:00 February 19th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

In 1956, François Truffaut was browsing in a Paris bookstore when his eyes fell on a copy of Jules et Jim by Henri-Pierre Roché. He was immediately drawn to the title and, as he studied the jacket, intrigued to discover that it was a septuagenarian's first novel. At the time Truffaut was twenty-four and supporting him­self by writing film criticism for Cahiers du Cinéma and Arts. He purchased the novel, took it home, and pored over it until, like a character in Fahrenheit 451, he knew it by heart.

PALE RIDER (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-18T11:19:33-08:00 February 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

As an actor, Eastwood never lets down his guard. His idea of being a real man is that it’s something you have to pretend to be—as Sergio Leone put it, he’s wearing a suit of armor. This actor has made a career out of his terror of expressiveness. Now here he is playing a stiff, a ghost. It’s perfect casting, but he doesn’t have the daring to let go and have fun with it. Even as a ghost, he’s armored.

BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-18T11:21:27-08:00 February 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

What keeps Back to the Future from being a comedy classic is that its eye is on the market. Despite Zemeckis and Gale’s wit in devising intricate structures that keep blowing fuses, the thinking here is cramped and conventional. I wish that moviemakers and their designers would stop using old Life magazines for their images of the American past.

SHEPHERDING THE WEAK: THE ETHICS OF REDEMPTION IN QUENTIN TARANTINO’S ‘PULP FICTION’

2018-02-15T20:32:40-08:00 February 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

Although a number of critics in the popular press laud Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction for its non-linear narrative, quirky performances, and oddly resonant dialogue regarding such issues as hamburgers, television pilot episodes, and foot massages, critics in other circles deride Tarantino’s creation for its extreme violence and lack of moral clarity.

IMAGISM AND MARTIN SCORSESE: IMAGES SUSPENDED AND EXTENDED – by George P. Castellitto

2018-02-15T19:01:33-08:00 February 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

Scorsese's technique of "freezing” objects generates a particular method of cinematic exposition in which characters and objects are portrayed in a moment between movement and non-movement; this “moment” is the bridge between potential behavior and stasis. The "thing” is frozen or suspended on the screen, and the possibility of either stasis or experience emerges from this momentary suspension.

VICTIM (1961) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-11T23:35:52-08:00 February 11th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

It was a bit startling to pick up an English newspaper and see that the review of Victim was entitled “Ten-letter word”—but as it turned out. The Observer was referring not to Lenny Bruce’s much publicized hyphenated word but to the simple term “homosexual,” which it appears is startling enough in a movie to make the Johnson office refuse to give Victim a seal of approval.

STANLEY KUBRICK: LA SOGGETTIVA DEL CADAVERE – di Vito Zagarrio

2018-02-09T17:27:46-08:00 February 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

La Storia, diceva ancora Baudrillard, è uno scenario rétro, è un “cadavere” che si può mettere in scena, un "fossile” che può essere rappresentato e “simulato”. «La Storia fa così il suo ingresso trionfale nel cinema a titolo postumo». Baudrillard no­tava come questa riapparizione della Storia non avesse un valore di presa di coscienza, ma di nostalgia di un referente perduto.

SCARECROW AND KINDERGARTEN: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS AND COMPARISON – by Alexander Gershkovich

2018-02-08T23:18:32-08:00 February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

The more an artist is worried by the problem of how his picture will be perceived by the public, what the critics will say, how the "authorities" will look on it, the greater the danger that the artist will deviate from the truth, and from his original conception, and the further he will be from the search for truth in art and from the sensitive questions of his time. And, as a result, the less will be the social impact of his film.

KUBRICK, FREUD E LA COAZIONE A RIPETERE – di Sandro Bernardi

2018-02-08T16:06:39-08:00 February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Che Kubrick conoscesse Freud è fuor di dubbio; lo si ricava da tutta la sua opera, ma basterebbe anche solo quell’accenno al Perturbante che il regista lascia cadere nell’intervista con Michel Ciment, a proposito del film The Shining: «Nel suo scritto sul perturbante Freud affermò che il per­turbante costituisce l’unica sensazione che si provi con maggior forza sia nell’arte che nella vita»

ACCATTONE: POET AND THE PIMP – Review by Stanley Kauffmann

2018-02-08T13:05:59-08:00 February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Accattone lives as a work of narrow but intense vision—a film about viciousness and criminality that evokes compassion. Its style is neorealist: it was made on locations, not in studios, with nonprofessional performers. Sometimes this method makes merely vernacular films, but it gives Accattone a grainy, gripping authenticity.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY: LOST IN THE STARS – Review by Stanley Kauffmann

2018-02-08T09:11:37-08:00 February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey took five years and $10 million to make, and it’s easy to see where the time and the money have gone. It’s less easy to understand how, for five years, Kubrick managed to concentrate on his ingenuity and ignore his talent.

EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK – by Penelope Gilliatt

2018-02-07T09:11:17-08:00 February 6th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

The above headline is taken from Dr. David Reuben’s book Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex but Were Afraid To Ask, a waggish tome now turned into a cockeyed and sometimes insanely funny film of the same name, written and directed by Woody Allen.

SALO, OR THE 120 DAYS OF SODOM: PASOLINI’S SADISTIC WORK OF ART – by Donald Farmer

2018-02-05T23:46:05-08:00 February 5th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , |

The circumstances accompanying the 1977 American release of Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom were almost as unusual as those depicted in this, the final film of Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini. Advance word in Film Comment, Film Quarterly and particu­larly The Village Voice indicated that Salo features extremes of sadism, violence and scatology then un­heard of in a major picture, and the publicity mills were scarcely hampered by the fact that Pasolini himself had been brutally murdered on November 2, 1975 - nearly six months after his film’s completion.

WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE (2014): HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS – By Nick Bradshaw

2018-02-04T01:17:51-08:00 February 4th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Hiromasa Yonebayashi’s When Marnie Was There transposes a classic of English children’s literature to modern-day Japan to tell the tale of an orphan discovering the dark secrets of her past, in what might well be the last in-house feature from the great animation house Studio Ghibli

WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE (2014) – Review by Kate Stables

2018-02-04T01:05:24-08:00 February 4th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

Despite the absence of the kind of imaginative spectacle or battle sequences that galvanised Spirited Away (2001) and Princess Mononoke (1997), When Marnie Was There is expertly atmospheric. Its action is all contained within its emotional ebb and flow, as fierce as the tides that lap at Marsh House.

THE GODFATHER: THE RESURRECTION OF DON BRANDO – Review by Richard Schickel

2018-02-03T19:23:51-08:00 February 3rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

There’s nothing fun or funny to be found here. It offers us only the absorption of good acting and good storytelling combined with a plausible anthropology of a strange, terribly relevant culture. What more could we possibly want from a movie? How often, these days, do we get anything like all that?

THE GODFATHER: HOW BRANDO BROUGHT DON CORLEONE TO LIFE – by Joseph Gelmis [Newsday]

2018-02-03T18:49:35-08:00 February 3rd, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

And then there was Marion Brando, against all the odds, cast in one of filmdom’s juiciest roles, as mob chief Don Vito Corleone. He was eased in, despite stiff opposition from the studio brass, because of the advocacy of a thirtyish fan, Francis Ford Coppola, an Italian-American who happened to be the director of The Godfather. Once he got the part, Brando in turn helped Coppola maintain camaraderie during the frenzied three-month shooting by kibitzing with the cast and establishing a fatherly relationship.