BEYOND THE STARS – by Jeremy Bernstein

2018-02-21T16:25:52-08:00 February 21st, 2018|Categories: CINEMA, INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , , |

We are happy to report, for the benefit of science-fiction buffs—who have long felt that, at its best, science fiction is a splendid medium for conveying the poetry and wonder of science—that there will soon be a movie for them. We have this from none other than the two authors of the movie, which is to be called Journey Beyond the Stars—Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke.

THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE (1972) – Review by Robert Hatch [The Nation]

2018-02-20T18:37:02-08:00 February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

By setting his film in the surreal world of dreaming, Buñuel casts himself as a jester rather than as an Old Testament prophet, crying "Woe, woe." Awake, this assemblage might have been too much for the old man’s equanimity; while they sleep, it is enough that he skip about them, poking them keenly with his rattle.

THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE: ANARCHIST’S LAUGHTER – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-20T18:23:47-08:00 February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a cosmic vaudeville show —an Old Master’s mischief. Now seventy-two, Luis Bunuel is no longer savage about the hypocrisy and the inanity of the privileged classes. They don’t change, and since they have become a persistent bad joke to him, he has grown almost fond of their follies—the way one can grow fond of the snarls and the silliness of vicious pets.

DELIVERANCE (1972) – Review by Richard Schickel

2018-02-20T16:12:34-08:00 February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

I suspect that James Dickey, who adapted his best-selling novel Deliverance for the screen, and John Boorman, who directed it, are trying to tell us something fairly important by subjecting four sober, settled, middle-class gentlemen in their thirties to a series of wilderness trials that test their courage and cunning in a manner we usually associate with the initiation of adolescents into primitive tribes.

FROM DOMESTIC NIGHTMARES TO THE NIGHTMARE OF HISTORY. UNCANNY ERUPTIONS OF VIOLENCE IN KING’S AND KUBRICK’S VERSIONS OF ‘THE SHINING’

2018-02-20T13:17:42-08:00 February 20th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

The impact of past violence on the present is examined in the novel and film versions of The Shining. John Lutz’s essay pinpoints in these works three interrelated elements of what Freud called the “uncanny”—the domestic abuse story, “the postcolonial narrative of American expansion at the expense of nonwhite victims, and the desire for power and control that underlies commodification and the social hierarchies that reinforce it.”

ADAPTATION OF AN AUTEUR: TRUFFAUT’S JULES ET JIM (1961) FROM THE NOVEL BY HENRI-PIERRE ROCHÉ – by Stuart Y. McDougal

2018-02-19T17:40:42-08:00 February 19th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

In 1956, François Truffaut was browsing in a Paris bookstore when his eyes fell on a copy of Jules et Jim by Henri-Pierre Roché. He was immediately drawn to the title and, as he studied the jacket, intrigued to discover that it was a septuagenarian's first novel. At the time Truffaut was twenty-four and supporting him­self by writing film criticism for Cahiers du Cinéma and Arts. He purchased the novel, took it home, and pored over it until, like a character in Fahrenheit 451, he knew it by heart.

PALE RIDER (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-18T11:19:33-08:00 February 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

As an actor, Eastwood never lets down his guard. His idea of being a real man is that it’s something you have to pretend to be—as Sergio Leone put it, he’s wearing a suit of armor. This actor has made a career out of his terror of expressiveness. Now here he is playing a stiff, a ghost. It’s perfect casting, but he doesn’t have the daring to let go and have fun with it. Even as a ghost, he’s armored.

BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-18T11:21:27-08:00 February 17th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

What keeps Back to the Future from being a comedy classic is that its eye is on the market. Despite Zemeckis and Gale’s wit in devising intricate structures that keep blowing fuses, the thinking here is cramped and conventional. I wish that moviemakers and their designers would stop using old Life magazines for their images of the American past.

SHEPHERDING THE WEAK: THE ETHICS OF REDEMPTION IN QUENTIN TARANTINO’S ‘PULP FICTION’

2018-02-21T10:17:23-08:00 February 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

Although a number of critics in the popular press laud Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction for its non-linear narrative, quirky performances, and oddly resonant dialogue regarding such issues as hamburgers, television pilot episodes, and foot massages, critics in other circles deride Tarantino’s creation for its extreme violence and lack of moral clarity.

IMAGISM AND MARTIN SCORSESE: IMAGES SUSPENDED AND EXTENDED – by George P. Castellitto

2018-02-15T19:01:33-08:00 February 15th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , , |

Scorsese's technique of "freezing” objects generates a particular method of cinematic exposition in which characters and objects are portrayed in a moment between movement and non-movement; this “moment” is the bridge between potential behavior and stasis. The "thing” is frozen or suspended on the screen, and the possibility of either stasis or experience emerges from this momentary suspension.

VICTIM (1961) – Review by Pauline Kael

2018-02-11T23:35:52-08:00 February 11th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , , |

It was a bit startling to pick up an English newspaper and see that the review of Victim was entitled “Ten-letter word”—but as it turned out. The Observer was referring not to Lenny Bruce’s much publicized hyphenated word but to the simple term “homosexual,” which it appears is startling enough in a movie to make the Johnson office refuse to give Victim a seal of approval.

STANLEY KUBRICK: LA SOGGETTIVA DEL CADAVERE – di Vito Zagarrio

2018-02-09T17:27:46-08:00 February 9th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , |

La Storia, diceva ancora Baudrillard, è uno scenario rétro, è un “cadavere” che si può mettere in scena, un "fossile” che può essere rappresentato e “simulato”. «La Storia fa così il suo ingresso trionfale nel cinema a titolo postumo». Baudrillard no­tava come questa riapparizione della Storia non avesse un valore di presa di coscienza, ma di nostalgia di un referente perduto.

SCARECROW AND KINDERGARTEN: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS AND COMPARISON – by Alexander Gershkovich

2018-02-08T23:18:32-08:00 February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

The more an artist is worried by the problem of how his picture will be perceived by the public, what the critics will say, how the "authorities" will look on it, the greater the danger that the artist will deviate from the truth, and from his original conception, and the further he will be from the search for truth in art and from the sensitive questions of his time. And, as a result, the less will be the social impact of his film.

KUBRICK, FREUD E LA COAZIONE A RIPETERE – di Sandro Bernardi

2018-02-08T16:06:39-08:00 February 8th, 2018|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

Che Kubrick conoscesse Freud è fuor di dubbio; lo si ricava da tutta la sua opera, ma basterebbe anche solo quell’accenno al Perturbante che il regista lascia cadere nell’intervista con Michel Ciment, a proposito del film The Shining: «Nel suo scritto sul perturbante Freud affermò che il per­turbante costituisce l’unica sensazione che si provi con maggior forza sia nell’arte che nella vita»