DAVID LYNCH’S THE ELEPHANT MAN – Review by Bruce Kawin [Film Quarterly]

2017-12-31T18:58:44-08:00 December 31st, 2017|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , , |

Not since Shakespeare called for “a muse of fire” in Henry V and Olivier provided the light of an arc-rod projector has there been such an interesting opportunity to examine the relations between film and theater as David Lynch’s The Elephant Man.

EYES WIDE SHUT: GHOST SONATA – By Richard T. Jameson [Film Comment]

2017-12-30T14:23:17-08:00 December 30th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , |

How are we supposed to watch Eyes Wide Shut? Really, how are we supposed to watch any Stanley Kubrick movie? Apprehension of so many of them has shifted between initial reviewing and years of re-viewing, of reconsideration from the vantage of a culture changed, often as not, by the films themselves.

THE GODFATHER: ALCHEMY – Review by Pauline Kael

2017-12-30T13:54:12-08:00 December 30th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , |

A wide, startlingly vivid view of a Mafia dynasty, in which organized crime becomes an obscene nightmare image of American free enterprise. The movie is a popular melodrama with its roots in the gangster films of the 30s, but it expresses a new tragic realism, and it's altogether extraordinary.

NOTA SU «DOPPIO SOGNO» – di Giuseppe Farese

2017-12-24T17:26:08-08:00 December 24th, 2017|Categories: LITERATURE|Tags: , , , |

Non v’è dubbio che la tematica onirico-reale-surreale di Traumnovelle, scritta da Arthur Schnitzler fra il 1921 e il 1925 ma già abbozzata nel 1907, eserciti una singolare attrazione sul lettore e lo induca, quasi naturalmente, a guardare alla psicoanalisi come al più vicino, ineludibile modello del suggestivo racconto.

FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA INTERVIEW (1974) – by Marjorie Rosen [Film Comment]

2018-01-18T12:30:59-08:00 December 20th, 2017|Categories: INTERVIEWS|Tags: , , , , , |

by Marjorie Rosen In Hollywood circles the adage, "You're as good as your last picture," holds more truth than is comfortable or healthy. It could also be why interviewing a director as the reviews for his latest opus are rolling in may either resemble a wake or a euphoric victory [...]

BARRY LYNDON: NARRATIVE AND DISCOURSE IN KUBRICK’S MODERN TRAGEDY – Essay by Michael Klein

2018-02-15T20:56:33-08:00 December 17th, 2017|Categories: CINEMA|Tags: , , , |

by Michael Klein Even inept films sometimes carry with them a certain mesmerizing authority. Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon, a flawed work based upon a rather uninspiring novel, can be enjoyed, for instance, for its visual effects: sheer photography. And the background music is superb.1 The music offputtingly classical under the [...]

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1968) – Review by Andrew Sarris [The Village Voice]

2017-12-17T11:25:38-08:00 December 17th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorised|Tags: , , , , |

Once Upon a Time in the West is Sergio Leone’s most American Western, but it is still dominantly and paradoxically European in spirit, at one and the same time Christian and Marxist, despairing and exultant, nihilistic and regenerative.